American Association for the Advancement of Science

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The American Association for the Advancement of Science, founded in 1848, is the world's largest general scientific organization. Its journal Science has one million paid subscribers.

However, it has been taken over by leftists and fails to uphold the first two of its lofty goals:

  • Enhance communication among scientists, engineers, and the public;
  • Promote and defend the integrity of science and its use;

in favor of two other goals:

  • Provide a voice for science on societal issues;
  • Promote the responsible use of science in public policy;

When findings which undermine its public policy platform are submitted to its journal, these findings are typically dismissed as being "of no interest". This directly contradicts of the key principles of science, which is to give all theories and hypothesis a reality check. It is actually very much in the interest of science (as a body of knowledge) as well as the scientific profession itself, when contrary findings are made known to other scientists. Otherwise, misleading and false information can be promoted by the unscrupulous (hucksters, rabble-rousers, and ideologues).

A 2009 poll showed that only 6% of AAAS members are Republicans.[1]

The anti-DDT campaign

Contrary to scientific facts, the AAAS condemned DDT as "environmentally unsafe". It based this assumption on a paper about birds and the alleged thinning of eggshells by DDT in their diet. In reality, the researcher had reduced calcium in the birds' diet while conducting the experiment, thereby falsifying the results. When this was exposed, and another study was performed showing that DDT consumption did not thin the birds' eggshells, the AAAS refused to publish the results in its journal Science. Dr. Thomas Jukes of UC Berkeley reported a conversation in which the editor of Science had revealed his policy of never publishing anything positive about DDT. [2]

See also

References

  1. [1]
  2. DDT: A Case Study in Scientific Fraud
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