American Government Homework Two 2007

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American Government.
Second Homework

Less reading this week. Read the chapter on the “Federalism”, pp. 47-52 in the textbook. Study it. Once you know it, then take the 15 multiple choice questions at the end. Grade your answers yourself, include your score in your homework, and study what you missed.

Method 1 uses the same point system as last week.

The alternative Method 2 consists of the following questions. The initial questions require only short answers, while the later questions require short paragraphs. Questions 1-9 are worth 3 points each.

1. Look up “dual federalism” in the textbook glossary. The adjective “dual” refers to __________ and _________.

2. Explain briefly the difference between “cooperative federalism” and “new federalism,” and their dates.

3. Identify by name and section the four main clauses of the Constitution that gives the federal government so much power.

4. What is an “unfunded mandate” and why is it criticized? Provide an example.

5. Provide and briefly explain one advantage and one disadvantage of federalism.

The next four questions are based on the Bill of Rights, pages 330-31.

6. If the police demanded to search a home, which Amendment would protect the owner? Explain.

7. Which two Amendments provide the states some protection against federal interference? Explain.

8. Does a criminal defendant have to testify at his trial? Explain. Can you think of reasons why he might not want to testify, even if innocent? (Many possible answers here.)

9. Read the Second Amendment. Do you think it protects an individual right to own a gun, or only a collective right by a militia to be armed? Explain.

Extra Credit (worth 5 points):

10. Your opinion please: is it better to free 50 guilty defendants rather than convict one innocent defendant? Whether your answer is “yes” or “no”, how do you rationalize the injustice that results from your answer? Explain with references to Amendments Four through Eight.

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