American Government and the Constitution Homework Four Answers

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U.S. Govt. Constitution Lecture 4 Homework Andrew B


1. The two provisions made by the constitution for the rules of elections can be found in A) Article I, Section 4, Clause 1 and B) Article II, Section 1, Clause 4. A) “ The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations…” B) “The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.” They leave the states the decision of choosing the time, place and manner of their elections.

CORRECT.

2. The fourth branch of the government otherwise known as agencies are exactly that. The IRS, FBI, etc. are all part of “the Fourth Branch” of the government.

CORRECT AGAIN.

3. Habeas Corpus is a provision in the constitution that states that any prisoner must have a government official come before a court and give the exact reason for which he is imprisoned. The constitution protects it by having it in it originally, the writers thought this to be a basic human right and therefore had it in the original constitution. It can be found in Article I, Section 9, clause 2. In history this has been suspended before, Abraham Lincoln suspended it during the civil war.

VERY GOOD.

4. Executive Privilege is the right of the executive officer to withhold information from Congress. I think that this is a very foolish thing because if the executive can do it then Congress and the Judiciary district will want to be able to have the same type of privilege and if this happens then everyone will be keeping secrets and that would just cause big problems. Then again it does keep a balance of power in between the three branches of the government. So, it could be a good thing. The Constitution in fact establishes three equal branches of the government. Otherwise one branch may become more powerful than another.

GOOD ANSWER THAT EXPLAINS BOTH SIDES OF THE ISSUE.

6. Impeachment is simply when a member of the government is accused of doing something wrong. IT DOES NOT MEAN THEY HAVE BEEN KICKED FROM OFFICE. If someone is impeached then the senate votes on whether or not to kick them out of office. A majority will get someone impeached while a ⅔ vote would have them indicted and removed from office. It has been used on Andrew Johnson, Bill Clinton, and Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase. In none of these cases was their a ⅔ majority so the person remained in office. BUT, the accusation caused them to lose a lot of respect. Also the chance of impeachment cause Richard Nixon to resign.

"WAS THEIR A" -> "WAS THERE A". YOUR ANSWER IS GOOD BUT IT OMITS THE PERCENTAGE REQUIRED FOR REMOVAL FROM OFFICE, WHICH IS 2/3RDS (67%). (-1)

7. Although President Lincolns suspension of Habeas Corpus was probably justified and okay, I do not think he should have done it because it sets a pattern for other presidents to do it in the future and they may not have good motives like Lincoln probably did.

NEED APOSTROPHE IN "PRESIDENT LINCOLN'S" - OTHERWISE YOUR ANSWER IS GOOD.

9. The spoils system was a system by which an incoming president could replace people in the government with people he wanted. The pendleton act ended this by havt government positions be based off of merits, thus a president cannot make the power imbalcanced because the people put into offices have to be done so based off of their previous positions/accomplishments.

MISSPELLINGS IN YOUR ANSWER, AND THE FIRST LETTERS OF PENDLETON ACT SHOULD BE CAPITALIZED: "Pendleton Act" - THE REMAINDER OF YOUR ANSWER IS OK.

TOTAL: 69/70 --Andy Schlafly 20:06, 2 November 2014 (EST)