Andrea Mitchell

From Conservapedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Andrea Mitchell is the Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent for NBC News and wife of the former Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan. Mitchell resides in Washington D.C. and has worked at NBC for over thirty years.

Contents

History

Early Career

Mitchell attended the University of Pennsylvania were she received a B.A in English literature. Before working in television, Mitchell spent nine years as a broadcast journalist for KYW Radio. In 1977 Mitchell began her television career as a CBS affiliate correspondent in Washington D.C.(WDVM-TV). Coincidentally, this was the same network where NBC News anchor Brian Williams began his career. [1]. Mitchell's job for CBS lasted until 1978 when NBC hired her as their general correspondent based in Washington D.C. After a NBC correspondent's murder in Guyana, Mitchell was given her first big assignment, covering the Jonestown massacre[2]. Soon she began moving up the ranks of the network and was named NBC News energy correspondent. It was in this role that she reported on many major domestic issues including the mid-1970s energy crisis and the 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island.[3]

1980-1998

With the Reagans administration in power in 1981, Mitchell began to cover the White House for NBC News. She reported on the Iran-Contra scandal, the president’s diplomatic relations with Mikhail Gorbachev and other important national and international issues. Her job at the White House lasted until 1988, when she became NBC's chief Congressional correspondent. The same year, she served as a panelist in the last debate between George H. Bush and Michael Dukakis. She was the first to announce that George H.W. Bush would choose Dan Quayle as his running mate.[4]

1988-2000

Between the years of 1988 and 1992 as chief Congressional correspondent, she frequently appeared on other NBC programs, and in 1992 covered Bill Clinton’s primary victory. Mitchell appeared as substitute host and panelist on Meet the Press and also as a political analyst on NBC’s Today show. Her work on “Nightly News with Tom Brokaw” in 1996 gave her the opportunity to travel around the globe. Assignments included reporting from North Korea, the Middle East, Kosovo, Pakistan, Bosnia, Haiti, and Afghanistan, where she covered Osama Bin Laden’s Al-Qaida network.[5]

2000-2007

The new decade bought many opportunities for Mitchell. Now serving as one of NBC top correspondents, she began hosting her own show, “The Mitchell Report.” The show primarily focused on the political landscape during the 2000 primary and general election as well as Hillary Clinton’s Senate race. In June 2001, NBC received the rare opportunity to interview Elian Gonzalez, a refugee from communist-controlled Cuba. Soon after, Cuba granted NBC an exclusive interview with Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. Mitchell was given the assignment. The interview lasted three hours and resulted in a one-hour documentary which was released in 2003. Both interviews brought stark criticism to both Mitchell and NBC. During the 2004 elections, Mitchell became a regular panelist for MSNBC’s "Hardball". At this time she achieved another hallmark in her journalistic career when she was first to announce that Senator John Kerry would pick John Edwards as his running mate. Currently, as chief Foreign Affairs correspondent, Mitchell covers domestic politics and foreign policy issues for NBC. During her thirty-year work at NBC, Mitchell has covered five administrations and traveled and interviewed many leading policy makers. As former Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw stated, “Andrea Mitchell [is] the go-to reporter when a big story is breaking in Washington and throughout the world.”[6]

Books

In 2005, Mitchell wrote a book about her experiences as a woman covering presidents, politics and foreign policy entitled “Talking Back.” Current NBC anchor Brian Williams praised the book and called it "a trail-blazing, heart-pounding ride through the best years in television journalism as chronicled by one of the best reporters in the business”[7]

Awards

Mitchell’s journalistic awards include the Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism, presented by the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum. At her acceptance speech, in March 2005, she called on fellow journalist to not air “pre-packaged government 'news' reports”. [8]

Criticism

Some of Mitchell’s past comments and interviews have been heavily criticized by conservatives and media watchdogs.

She has been accused of parroting unsubstantiated news (a tabloid method) and displaying an ever-increasing bias for Democrats. She regularly defends Barack Obama without journalistic objectivity, and has been critical of John McCain by calling him a forum cheater[Citation Needed] and characterizing his campaign ads as unfair.

Republican Base and Torture

After the Republican primary debate in May 2007, Mitchell commented that Republicans “played to the base. They played to, ‘Let’s torture ‘em!’ I mean, they, they didn’t say that literally, but that was the subliminal message."[9]

Bush Administration

Mitchell also claimed that the Bush administration was spreading propaganda, and slammed fellow reporters for using it. At an journalism awards ceremony, Mitchell said "On issues from Medicare to farm prices, hundreds of local stations are running stories extolling Bush Administration policies, reaching tens of millions of people every day, but all of these reports were written and distributed by the administration itself and its public relations firms, not by journalists,”[10]

CIA Leak

In 2005 Mitchell (along with co-worker, Tim Russert) was a suspect in the CIA leak case. NBC released a statement saying that “her first discussion with an administration official about the matter was after the Robert Novak column was published. And that discussion, she said, was off the record. NBC News never has disclosed the name of the agent."[11] She and Russert were later found innocent.

2004 Election

In the 2004 presidential campaign Mitchell appeared on NBC Nightly News. Covering the Vietnam veterans' attack on presidential candidate John Kerry, she stated that the group might just “get away with it.” [12] She later claimed that"none of the men actually served on either of Kerry's swift boats,” [13]despite the fact that the men in the ad were former colleagues of Kerry's[14].

Elian Gonzalez Interview

Both of Mitchell’s interviews in 2001 were the target of strong criticism. Some critics claimed that Castro had picked the right reporter for the job, and also also claimed that in her interview with Elian Gonzalez she distorted the situation in Cuba. She painted an idyllic picture of the boy's hometown in Cuba, saying: “Their hometown, Cardenas, a small fishing village two hours from Havana, where people still get around by horse and carriage.” She also stated in her report that if he had stayed in the United States, Elian may have been "seduced by all of these toys and trips to Disney World." [15]

Fidel Castro Interview

Critics claim that her interview with Cuban dictator Fidel Castro sounded much like a “promotional spot for Castro as caring grandpa”[16]. She characterized the dictator as, "old-fashioned, courtly -- even paternal," [17], and praised his leadership. "What’s astounding is how much Castro is personally micro-managing the Elian case. He’s not just the country’s head of state, he’s the CEO," she stated in her report. Conservative websites claimed that she “mentioned none of the drawbacks to life in the socialist dictatorship.”[18]

References

  1. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3667173/
  2. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0670034037/ref=dp_proddesc_0/102-3275846-3467353?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  3. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3688874/
  4. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3688874/
  5. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3688874/
  6. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0670034037/ref=dp_proddesc_0/102-3275846-3467353?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  7. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/product-description/0670034037/ref=dp_proddesc_0/102-3275846-3467353?ie=UTF8&n=283155&s=books
  8. http://www.hno.harvard.edu/gazette/2005/03.24/15-goldsmith.html
  9. http://www.mrc.org/notablequotables/2007/nq20070618.asp
  10. http://www.hno.harvard.edu/gazette/2005/03.24/15-goldsmith.html
  11. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-fiderer/andrea-mitchells-prime-t_b_10973.html
  12. http://www.mediaresearch.org/cyberalerts/2004/cyb20040807.asp
  13. http://www.mediaresearch.org/cyberalerts/2004/cyb20040807.asp
  14. http://www.mediaresearch.org/cyberalerts/2004/cyb20040807.asp
  15. http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y01/jun01/29e5.htm
  16. http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y01/jun01/29e5.htm
  17. http://www.cubanet.org/CNews/y01/jun01/29e5.htm
  18. http://www.mrc.org/SpecialReports/2007/castro/welcome.asp

External Links

Personal tools