Militant atheism, alcoholism and anger

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Alcoholism was a serious social problem in the former militantly atheistic Soviet Union.[1] Between 1940 and 1980, this atheist state had the largest increase of the amount of alcohol usage in the developed world.[2]

The Barna Group found that atheists and agnostics in America were more likely, than theists in America, to look upon the following behaviors as morally acceptable: illegal drug use; excessive drinking; sexual relationships outside of marriage; abortion; cohabitating with someone of opposite sex outside of marriage; obscene language; gambling; pornography and obscene sexual behavior; and engaging in homosexuality/bisexuality.[3]

Atheists and atheistic cultures often have significant problems with excess alcohol usage (For more information please see: Atheism and alcoholism).

In addition, studies indicate that religious individuals are less likely to engage in illegal drug use than atheists/nonreligious.[4][5][6] See also: Atheism and drug addiction

Furthermore, alcoholism had been linked to poor anger control both as a cause and effect of alcoholism.[7][8][9]

On January 1, 2011, CNN reported:

People unaffiliated with organized religion, atheists and agnostics also report anger toward God either in the past, or anger focused on a hypothetical image - that is, what they imagined God might be like - said lead study author Julie Exline, Case Western Reserve University psychologist.

In studies on college students, atheists and agnostics reported more anger at God during their lifetimes than believers.[10]

Various studies found that traumatic events in people's lives has a positive correlation with "emotional atheism".[11]

The atheist and lesbian Greta Christina told the journalist Chris Mooney on the Point of Inquiry podcast, "there isn't one emotion" that affects atheists "but anger is one of the emotions that many of us have ...[it] drives others to participate in the movement".[12]

Vox Day declared:

...the age at which most people become atheists indicates that it is almost never an intellectual decision, but an emotional one.[13]

The Christian apologist Ken Ammi concurs in his essay The Argument for Atheism from Immaturity and writes:

It is widely known that some atheists rejected God in their childhood, based on child like reasons, have not matured beyond these childish notions and thus, maintain childish-emotional reactions toward the idea of God.[14]

Although anti-theists, militant atheists and New Atheists give the general public the perception that atheists are exceedingly angry individuals, research indicates that the atheist population as a whole is not angrier than the general population (see: Various types of atheists/non-believers and anger).

Jesus Christ and Christendom have emphasized the important of forgiveness and in the last few decades mental health specialists have increasingly seen the importance of forgiveness to alleviate anger and other emotional problems within individuals.[15]

For more information, please see: Atheism and anger

Atheism and alcoholism

According to the World Health Organization's (WHO) regional office in Europe, "The WHO European Region has the highest proportion in the world of total ill health and premature death due to alcohol.[16]

See also: Atheism and alcoholism

As noted above, atheists and atheistic cultures often have significant problems with excess alcohol usage (For more information please see: Atheism and alcoholism).

Secular countries/regions and alcoholism

Secular Europe:

According to the World Health Organization's (WHO) regional office in Europe, "The WHO European Region has the highest proportion in the world of total ill health and premature death due to alcohol.[17]


Australia:

An Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD) report indicated that 20% of Australians drink at levels putting them at risk of lifetime harm.[18]

For more information, please see: Irreligious Australia and alcoholism


According to tourguide who has been to North Korea more than 100 times, "North Koreans’ main hobby is probably drinking".[19] Leonid A. Petrov, a North Korea expert at Australia National University, indicated "North Korean people tend to drink more and [drink] stronger liquor".[20]

Asian countries:


History of communism:

Alcoholism was a serious social problem in the former militantly atheistic Soviet Union.[21] Between 1940 and 1980, this atheist state had the largest increase of the amount of alcohol usage in the developed world.[22]

See also

References

  1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18245818
  2. Alcoholism in the Soviet Union
  3. http://www.barna.org/barna-update/article/5-barna-update/58-practical-outcomes-replace-biblical-principles-as-the-moral-standard
  4. Believers Consume Fewer Drugs Than Atheists, Christian Post, By Jim Denison, Christian Post Columnist, October 9, 2013|9:47 am
  5. Believers consume fewer drugs than atheists, Science Daily, Date:October 3, 2013, Source: Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung]
  6. Multiple references:
  7. J Adolesc Health. 2001 Jun;28(6):450-7. From early to late adolescence: alcohol use and anger relationships. Weiner MD1, Pentz MA, Turner GE, Dwyer JH.
  8. [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20409438 J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2010, May;71(3):434-44. Negative affect, relapse, and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA): does AA work by reducing anger? Kelly JF1, Stout RL, Tonigan JS, Magill M, Pagano ME.
  9. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998 Jun;22(4):902-7. Anger in an inpatient treatment sample of chronic alcoholics.Tivis LJ1, Parsons OA, Nixon SJ.
  10. Anger at God common, even among atheists
  11. When atheists are angry at God by Joe Carter at FirstThings.com website
  12. Greta Christina - Why Are You Atheists So Angry?
  13. Answering an atheist's question
  14. [1]
  15. Indian J Psychiatry. 2009 Apr-Jun; 51(2): 153–156. doi: 10.4103/0019-5545.49459, PMCID: PMC2755173, Forgiveness: A note for psychiatrists by Prakash Gangdev
  16. World Health Organization's (WHO) regional office in Europe - Alcohol usage of Europe
  17. World Health Organization's (WHO) regional office in Europe - Alcohol usage of Europe
  18. One in eight deaths of young Australians attributable to alcohol: National Council on Drugs report By Jane Mower, Updated 19 Nov 2013, 7:28pm
  19. Getting Drunk in North Korea, The Atlantic by Robert Foyle Hunwick, Sep 4 2013, 9:00 AM ET
  20. Getting Drunk in North Korea, The Atlantic by Robert Foyle Hunwick, Sep 4 2013, 9:00 AM ET
  21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18245818
  22. Alcoholism in the Soviet Union