Atheism and sloth

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In the former Soviet Union, a popular joke was that the workers pretended to work and the Soviet Union pretended to pay them.[1]

Sloth is a "reluctance to work or make an effort; laziness."[2]

Historically and in contemporary societies, a majority of atheists lean politically to the left (see: Atheism and politics and Secular left).

According to the University of Cambridge, the "most notable spread of atheism was achieved through the success of the 1917 Russian Revolution, which brought the Marxist-Leninists to power."[3] Vitalij Lazarʹevič Ginzburg, a Soviet physicist, wrote that the "Bolshevik communists were not merely atheists but, according to Lenin's terminology, militant atheists."[4]

As can be seen below, sloth in atheistic societies (such as atheistic communist countries) has contributed to poverty and lower economic productivity within various atheistic societies.

In addition, atheists have established a reputation for engaging in hedonism (see: Atheism and hedonism).

Contents

Sloth in atheistic communist countries vs. Protestant work ethic

See also: Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and Atheism and economic prosperity

In China, the growth in religion has accompanied China’s fast economic growth over the last twenty years.[5]

Atheism is a part of Marxist-Leninist and Maoist/Chinese communist ideology (See: Atheism and communism).

Widespread sloth in the former Soviet Union helped cause much poverty.[6][7] A study performed in the former Soviet Union found that over 50% of the work force admitted to drinking alcohol while on the job (See also: Atheism and alcoholism).[8] In the former Soviet Union, a popular joke was that the workers pretended to work and the Soviet Union pretended to pay them.[9]

On the other hand, the atheist and Harvard University historian Niall Ferguson declared: "Through a mixture of hard work and thrift the Protestant societies of the North and West Atlantic achieved the most rapid economic growth in history."[10]

In China, the growth in religion has accompanied China’s fast economic growth over the last twenty years.[11] Christianity is seeing rapid growth in China and the historian Niall Ferguson attributes this recent economic growth to the Protestant work ethic being more incorporated into Chinese society.[12] See also: Protestant work ethic and Growth of Christianity in China

Atheistic communism and forced labor

See also: Atheism and forced labor and Religion and abolitionism

In atheistic communist regimes forced labor has often played a significant role in their economies and this practice continues to this day.[13] [14][15][16]

The black conservative author and commentator Thomas Sowell wrote in an essay entitled Ending slavery: "The anti-slavery movement was spearheaded by people who would today be called 'the religious right' and its organization was created by conservative businessmen."[17] See also: Religion and abolitionism

Secular Europe's economic crisis

Euro banknotes

Europe is an economically developed region with growing long term economic problems as can be see by the articles below:

The Eurozone Crisis is an ongoing economic crisis which has been negatively affecting Eurozone countries since late 2009. It consists of a sovereign debt crisis, a banking crisis and an economic growth and competitiveness crisis.

Western Europeans work less hours than Americans and workers in many other countries.[18][19][20] Commenting on this matter, Niall Ferguson wrote a 2004 article published in The Telegraph entitled, "The atheist sloth ethic, or why Europeans don't believe in work".[21]

Niall Ferguson also noted in his article:

There are, for example, many more Europeans out of work than Americans; over the past decade, US unemployment has averaged 4.6 per cent, compared with 9.2 per cent for the EU. Another difference is in labour participation. Between 1973 and 1998, the percentage of the American population in employment rose from 41 to 49 per cent. But in Germany and France, the equivalent percentage fell to, respectively, 44 and 39 per cent.[22]
In 2014, Sweden's new Social Democrat prime minister Stefan Loefven said, "Sweden is in a serious situation -- unemployment has become entrenched at high levels, school results have collapsed and the welfare system has major shortcomings".[23]

In addition, one the significant causes of Europe's economic stagnation is an aging population and the low fertility rates in many European countries.[24]

The regions of secular Europe which are performing better than the rest of Europe often have a cultural legacy of the Protestant work ethic. For example, a 2011 Telegraph article noted: "Either way, not a single Protestant or Germanic EU country has so far needed a bailout."[25] The Protestant Reformation started in Germany and Germany has one of the strongest economies of Europe.

See also:

In addition, many irreligious states (includes various countries in secular Europe) engage in an economic policy of tax, spend and sovereign debt accumulation (see also: Atheism and politics and Secular left).[26]

Although the United States with its tradition of religious freedom and a strong work ethic has experienced high levels of prosperity and religiosity, often prosperity is inversely proportional to religious belief due to men's arrogance when they become wealthier.[27][28] Vox Day has pointed out that arrogant and godless nations have often eventually experienced significant hardships [29] Economic and societal instability is positively correlated to greater religiosity.[30] Economic/societal instability in Europe could cause Europe to become more religious.[31][32][33]

Economic and societal deterioration in secular Sweden

See: Economic and societal deterioration in secular Sweden

Protestant work ethic statistics

Protestant missionaries and economic development statistic

The article The Surprising Discovery About Those Colonialist, Proselytizing Missionaries published in Christianity Today notes:

In his fifth year of graduate school, Woodberry created a statistical model that could test the connection between missionary work and the health of nations. He and a few research assistants spent two years coding data and refining their methods. They hoped to compute the lasting effect of missionaries, on average, worldwide...

One morning, in a windowless, dusty computer lab lit by fluorescent bulbs, Woodberry ran the first big test. After he finished prepping the statistical program on his computer, he clicked "Enter" and then leaned forward to read the results.

"I was shocked," says Woodberry. "It was like an atomic bomb. The impact of missions on global democracy was huge. I kept adding variables to the model—factors that people had been studying and writing about for the past 40 years—and they all got wiped out. It was amazing. I knew, then, I was on to something really important."

Woodberry already had historical proof that missionaries had educated women and the poor, promoted widespread printing, led nationalist movements that empowered ordinary citizens, and fueled other key elements of democracy. Now the statistics were backing it up: Missionaries weren't just part of the picture. They were central to it...

Areas where Protestant missionaries had a significant presence in the past are on average more economically developed today, with comparatively better health, lower infant mortality, lower corruption, greater literacy, higher educational attainment (especially for women), and more robust membership in nongovernmental associations.

In short: Want a blossoming democracy today? The solution is simple—if you have a time machine: Send a 19th-century missionary."[34]

Protestant work ethic and China: Additional information

According to Slate, "Protestant Christianity has been the fastest growing religion in China."[35] Evangelical Christianity is especially growing sharply in China.[36]

Hugh Whelchel's article The Protestant Work Ethic: Alive & Well…In China declares:

Christianity has exploded in China over the last twenty years. A 2011 report from the BBC conservatively estimated there were 60 million Christians in China. Small, primarily Protestant “house churches” are especially having a strong impact on the country.

This growth in religion has accompanied China’s rapid economic growth over the last twenty years. Now the world’s 2nd largest economy, China illustrates how even a limited amount of economic freedom has the power to lift millions of Chinese out of abject poverty and build one of the strongest economies in the world.

Ferguson suggests that China is starting to supplant the West, but is doing it by becoming more Western. China is booting up several of Ferguson’s “killer apps” – especially the Protestant Work Ethic.[37]

Protestantism and the Eurozone crisis

A 2011 Telegraph article said about the Eurozone Crisis: "Either way, not a single Protestant or Germanic EU country has so far needed a bailout."[38]

Western World nations with Protestant cultural legacies

The website Cultural Front notes:

In chapter 6 of Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell highlights cultural legacies. He opens with disturbing descriptions of how longstanding cultural patterns and beliefs influenced violent conflicts among generations of families in Kentucky during the 19th century.

The compelling research findings concerning long-term and deeply held values led Gladwell to the conclusion that cultural legacies are powerful forces. They have deep roots and long lives. They persist, generation after generation, virtually intact, even as the economic and social demographic conditions that spawned them have vanished, and they play such a role in directing attitudes and behavior that we cannot make sense of our world without them. He goes on to note the possibilities of “taking cultural legacies seriously” in order to learn “why people succeed and how to make people better.”[39]

When atheist apologists cite various favorable economic statistics of irreligious countries which formerly had a strong presence of Protestantism (typically in Northern Europe), they generally do not mention the issue of the effects of cultural legacies.

Atheism, social justice and poor efforts/results

See also: Atheism and uncharitableness and Irreligion and domestic violence

Although secular leftist often pay lip service to social justice, their actual efforts fall significantly short of the ideals they espouse (see: Atheism and social justice).

Atheism and uncharitableness

A beggar in Cambodia. In Cambodia, the vast majority of the population adheres to a nontheistic form of Buddhism called the Theravada school of Buddhism. A comprehensive study by Harvard University professor Robert Putnam found that religious people are more charitable than their irreligious counterparts.[40]

See also: Atheism and charity

Concerning the issue of atheism and charity, charitable giving by atheists and agnostics in America is significantly less than by theists, according to a study by the Barna Group:

The typical no-faith American donated just $200 in 2006, which is more than seven times less than the amount contributed by the prototypical active-faith adult ($1500). Even when church-based giving is subtracted from the equation, active-faith adults donated twice as many dollars last year as did atheists and agnostics. In fact, while just 7% of active-faith adults failed to contribute any personal funds in 2006, that compares with 22% among the no-faith adults.[41]

A comprehensive study by Harvard University professor Robert Putnam found that religious people are more charitable than their irreligious counterparts.[42][43] The study revealed that forty percent of worship service attending Americans volunteer regularly to help the poor and elderly as opposed to 15% of Americans who never attend services.[44][45] Moreover, religious individuals are more likely than non-religious individuals to volunteer for school and youth programs (36% vs. 15%), a neighborhood or civic group (26% vs. 13%), and for health care (21% vs. 13%).[46][47]

Arthur C. Brooks wrote in Policy Review regarding data collected in the Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey (SCCBS) (data collected by in 2000 by researchers at universities throughout the United States and the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research):

The differences in charity between secular and religious people are dramatic. Religious people are 25 percentage points more likely than secularists to donate money (91 percent to 66 percent) and 23 points more likely to volunteer time (67 percent to 44 percent). And, consistent with the findings of other writers, these data show that practicing a religion is more important than the actual religion itself in predicting charitable behavior. For example, among those who attend worship services regularly, 92 percent of Protestants give charitably, compared with 91 percent of Catholics, 91 percent of Jews, and 89 percent from other religions.[48]

Irreligion and domestic violence

See also: Irreligion and domestic violence and Atheism and women

Research suggests that irreligiousity is a causal factor for domestic violence.[49]

The abstract for the 2007 article in the journal Violence Against Women entitled Race/Ethnicity, Religious Involvement, and Domestic Violence indicated:

The authors explored the relationship between religious involvement and intimate partner violence by analyzing data from the first wave of the National Survey of Families and Households. They found that: (a) religious involvement is correlated with reduced levels of domestic violence; (b) levels of domestic violence vary by race/ethnicity; (c) the effects of religious involvement on domestic violence vary by race/ethnicity; and (d) religious involvement, specifically church attendance, protects against domestic violence, and this protective effect is stronger for African American men and women and for Hispanic men, groups that, for a variety of reasons, experience elevated risk for this type of violence.[50]

Also, a quote from the journal article Race/Ethnicity, Religious Involvement, and Domestic Violence:

Another line of thought suggests that religious people may be less likely to perpe- trate domestic violence (Fergusson, Horwood, Kershaw, & Shannon, 1986). A 1999 study of U.S. couples found that both men and women who attend religious services regularly are less likely to commit acts of domestic violence than those who attend rarely or not at all (Ellison et al., 1999). A follow-up study identified three pathways through which religious involvement may operate; namely, increasing levels of social integration and social support, reducing the likelihood of alcohol or substance abuse, and decreasing the risk of psychological problems (Ellison & Anderson, 2001). However, even after considering such indirect effects of religion through the use of sta- tistical controls, that study found that regular religious involvement still had a protec- tive effect against the perpetration of domestic violence by both men and women (Ellison & Anderson, 2001). In addition, that study showed that evidence of such pro- tective religious effects persisted regardless of whether domestic violence was measured using data from self reports or partner reports, which makes it difficult to attribute these observed religious effects to simple social desirability or other response bias.[51]

The Journal of Family Issues also reported that religious belief diminishes the likelihood of domestic violence.[52]

Secular Europe and domestic violence

See also: Secular Europe and domestic violence

Sweden is one of the most atheistic countries in the world.[53] In Sweden, 81 percent of women said they had been harassed at some point after the age of 15 - compared to the EU average of 55 percent.[54]

Sweden, Denmark, France, the Netherlands and Finland have high rates of godlessless (see irreligion demographic statistics given in the article Secular Europe and domestic violence).

In March 2014, the Swedish news website The Local published an article entitled Sweden stands out in domestic violence study which declared:

A new EU review of violence against women has revealed that one in three European women has been assaulted, and one in twenty has been raped, with the Scandinavian countries at the top of the league tables.

In the Scandinavian countries, in contrast, around half of the women reported physical or sexual violence, which researchers at the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights said could have several explanations...

In Sweden, 81 percent of women said they had been harassed at some point after the age of 15 - compared to the EU average of 55 percent. After Sweden, which had the highest rate, Denmark, France, the Netherland and Finland all saw rates above 70 percent. The EU member state with the lowest rate - 24 percent - was Bulgaria.[55]

Atheism and lower racial diversity than Christendom

See also: Western atheism and race and Atheist population

Mayan women. In recent years, evangelical Christianity has seen rapid growth in Guatemala.[56] In 1976, a major earthquake hit Guatemala. As a result, an influx of evangelicals, primarily Pentecostal denominations, provided relief and support after the earthquake.[57]

Although secular leftist often extol the benefits of cultural and ethnic diversity, the current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[58] See: Western atheism and race

In 2015, BloombergView reported concerning the United States:

According to a much-discussed 2012 report from the Pew Research Center on Religion and Public Life, only 3 percent of U.S. atheists and agnostics are black, 6 percent are Hispanic, and 4 percent are Asian. Some 82 percent are white. (The relevant figures for the population at large at the time of the survey were 66 percent white, 11 percent black, 15 percent Hispanic, 5 percent Asian.)

...Craig Keener, in his huge review of claims of miracles in a wide variety of cultures, concludes that routine rejection of the possibility of the supernatural represents an impulse that is deeply Eurocentric.[59]

In October 2010, an atheists' meeting was organized in the United States concerning the future direction of the atheist movement and 370 people attended. The New York Times described the attendees as "The largely white and male crowd — imagine a Star Trek convention, but older...".[60] See also: Atheism and women

On the other hand, in terms of its geographic distribution, Christianity is the most globally diverse religion.[61] Christianity has recently seen explosive growth outside the Western World.[62]

Irreligious Britain and low social mobility

See also: Irreligious Britain and low social mobility and Britain and the history of social Darwinism

A Eurobarometer poll in 2010 reported that 37% of UK citizens "believed there is a God", 33% believe there is "some sort of spirit or life force" and 25% answered "I don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force".[63] See also: British atheism

The Guardian reported in 2012, "Britain has some of the lowest social mobility in the developed world - the OECD figures show our earnings in the UK are more likely to reflect our fathers' than any other country."[64]

Atheistic societies, low fertility rates and the work associated with raising children

See also: Atheism and marriage and Atheist marriages and Atheism and abortion

Atheistic countries commonly have sub-replacement fertility rates. In addition, atheists commonly are not against abortion. See also: Abortion and atheism

Raising children properly involves a considerable amount of time, finances and self-sacrifice (see also: Atheism and narcissism).

On December 23, 2012, Professor Eric Kaufmann who teaches at Birbeck College, University of London wrote:

I argue that 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious.

On the other hand, the secular West and East Asia has very low fertility and a rapidly aging population... In the coming decades, the developed world's demand for workers to pay its pensions and work in its service sector will soar alongside the booming supply of young people in the third world. Ergo, we can expect significant immigration to the secular West which will import religious revival on the back of ethnic change. In addition, those with religious beliefs tend to have higher birth rates than the secular population, with fundamentalists having far larger families. The epicentre of these trends will be in immigration gateway cities like New York (a third white), Amsterdam (half Dutch), Los Angeles (28% white), and London, 45% white British. [65]

Michael Blume, a researcher at the University of Jena in Germany, wrote "Most societies or communities that have espoused atheistic beliefs have not survived more than a century."[66] Blume also indicated concerning concerning his research on this matter: "What I found was the complete lack of a single case of a secular population, community or movement that would just manage to retain replacement level."[67] See also: Atheism and sexuality

Eric Kaufmann has pointed out that the biblical verse to "go forth and multiply" and similar passages of Scripture has contributed to a higher fertility rate for conservative Christians and Orthodox Jews.[68][69][70]

Western atheists and apathetic efforts at evangelism

See also: Atheism and apathy

A subgroup of atheists/agnostics refers to themselves as apatheists.

According Pew Research:

In the 2014 Religious Landscape Study, self-identified atheists were asked how often they share their views on God and religion with religious people. Only about one-in-ten atheists (9%) say they do at least weekly, while roughly two-thirds (65%) say they seldom or never discuss their views on religion with religious people. By comparison, 26% of those who have a religious affiliation share their views at least once a week with those who have other beliefs; 43% say they seldom or never do.[71]

Atheist Francois Tremblay wrote: "One last problem that undermines any propagation of atheism is inspiration. Let's be honest here, 'there is no god!' is not a very motivating call for most people."[72]

The ex-atheist Alister McGrath has repeatedly pointed out the uninspiring nature of atheism.[73][74] According to McGrath, atheism is "stale", "dull" and difficult to believe.[75] Throughout mankind's history, most people have found atheism to be uninspiring (See also: Atheism and inspiration).

Western World atheists unwilling to endure hardship to globally spread atheism

Watoto Children's Choir from Kampala, Uganda. In recent years, Christianity has seen a rapid growth in Africa.[76] In 2005, there were four times as many non-Western World Christians as there were Western World Christians.[77]

See also: Global atheism and Global Christianity and Christian evangelism

The former Soviet Union had a worldwide expansionist policy as far as spreading atheistic communism.[78] The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to a spike in religious affiliation, both in Russia and in Eastern Europe.[79] See also: Atheist indoctrination

On the other hand, Western World atheists have not been willing to put significant effort into spreading atheism worldwide.

Doing overseas evangelism/outreaches, often requires significant work/hardships/persecution. In addition, evangelism often requires travelling great distances. Western World atheists have been unwilling to endure such hardships in order to spread atheistic ideology.

On the other hand, historically, Christians have made great evangelism efforts to reach every people group across the earth. In 2005, there were four times as many non-Western World Christians as there were Western World Christians.[80]

Most atheists do not attend atheist meetings or engage in atheist activism

See also: Atheism and apathy and Atheism and social skills

The atheist Rebecca Watson was a central figure in the Elevatorgate scandal which focused on an event which occurred at an atheist conference and Richard Dawkins' reaction to the event. The scandal caused further division among atheists.

Dr. J. Gordon Melton said about the atheist movement (organized atheism) that atheism is not a movement which tends to create community, but in the last few years there has been some growth of organized atheism.[81]

Although there are atheist meetings, conferences and a few atheist churches, most atheists do not attend them (see: Atheist conferences and Atheist churches).

In addition, most atheists do not engage in atheist activism and among the ones who do, there is often contention/disharmony (see: Atheist movement and Atheist factions).

The Atheist Community of Buffalo, and Western New York has on their about page of their website:

Wondering why it was that we had talked about doing a Podcast for years, but just never quite got around to it. Wondering why having the Center For Inquiry in our backyard never got our asses up, and out on a Friday night to hear lectures given by people that we admire, and have been reading, and reading about, for years. We wondered if we would sit in our air-conditioned offices for years, wondering why we never decided to act.

And so, returning home without any answers...we decided to dive head first into the Atheist Community of our hometown. We decided to find out who was doing what, throw ourselves in the thick of it. And, after doing our research, here is what we found:

Whoever said organizing Atheists is like herding cats was not wrong.[82]

Mary Eberstadt wrote:

How often is the refusal to attend religious services really a result of high-minded principle -- and how often instead an unwillingness to get out of bed on Sunday morning, to leave the internet for no apparent purpose for even one hour a week, or to be bothered in any way at all from doing what "I" want to do with "my" time? One suspects that Sloth is similarly helpful to the spread of secularism itself. Faith, after all, is more like a muscle than an instinct; it is only by exercising that most people can even begin to learn how to use it.[83]
See also: Internet atheism

Sloth, American atheists and sports participation/performance

See also: Sports performance: Religious faith vs. atheism

Involvement in sports and high achievement in sports often takes engaging in high levels of activity, dedication and a willingness to endure various sports related injuries.

Numerous studies report that athletes to be more religious than non-athletes.[84]

The Sports Journal is a monthly refereed journal published by the United States Sports Academy. A journal article appeared in the Sports Journal entitled Strength of Religious Faith of Athletes and Nonathletes at Two NCAA Division III Institutions. The article was submitted by Nathan T. Bell, Scott R. Johnson, and Jeffrey C. Petersen from Ball State University.[85]

An excerpt from the abstract of the journal article Strength of Religious Faith of Athletes and Nonathletes at Two NCAA Division III Institutions declares:

Numerous studies report athletes to be more religious than nonathletes (Fischer, 1997; Storch, Kolsky, Silvestri, & Storch, 2001; Storch et al., 2004). According to Storch, Kolsky, Silvestri, and Storch (2001), four reasons may explain why religion interacts with athletic performance. First, athletes may identify with religious beliefs for direction and humility. Second, athletes may turn to religion to gain a sense of optimism and security, benefiting from such beliefs following a disappointing athletic performance. Third, religion can be used for emotional and psychological support in stressful circumstances like the uncertainty of athletic competition, which can cause athletes an overwhelming amount of anxiety. Religious beliefs can offer the internal strength to persevere through the stress. Fourth, religion “provides a cognitive framework conducive to the relief of anxiety associated with competition” (Storch et al., 2001, p. 347). This framework allows relief from fear and anxiety on the basis of the athlete’s understanding (i.e., belief) that a supreme being is in complete control of the situation. For example, athletes may rely on religious faith to place a poor athletic performance in perspective...

Religion can be an important aspect in athletes’ lives and may serve a protective function against psychological distress and maladaptive behaviors such as substance use or aggression (Storch, Roberti, Bravata, & Storch, 2004). Viewers of sporting events can frequently observe athletes pointing to the sky, engaging in team prayer on the court or field, and glorifying God following athletic competitions.[86]

Atheist nerds

See also: Atheist nerds

Nerds are known for their lack of participation in sports.

In 2013, the atheist PZ Myers declared:

If we're going to expand our base and we're going to draw in more people to recognize the virtues of living in a secular world, we need to appeal to more than just that geek and nerd subset of the population. We need to have a wider base. ...I seriously believe that we're on the cusp of a crisis. We're not there yet but it's looming in front of us. Will we adapt and thrive and change the world? Or will we remain an avocation for a prosperous and largely irrelevant subset of the population? Will we become something more than a scattered society of internet nerds? That's what we have to do.[87]

In response, David Klinghoffer at Evolution News and Views wrote:

A crisis looms, in Myers's view, because he looks around himself and sees a not very promising basis for a mass movement. He's right. There is indeed a quality of geeky isolation from reality, common sense, and the fullness of life that I see as a motif in atheist and Darwin activism alike.[88]

Atheism, sloth and obesity

Two of the major risk factors for becoming obese according to the Mayo Clinic are poor dietary choices and inactivity.[89] Most individuals are overweight due to their dietary and exercise habits.[90] See also: Bariatric science

Currently, a significant portion of the atheist community is overweight/obese as can be seen by the articles cited below:

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[91] See: Atheist population

Secular Europe and obesity

See also: Secular Europe and obesity

In May 2014, the British paper The Mirror reported that according to the British medical journal Lancet, British girls are the most overweight girls in Western Europe.[92]

From a global perspective, secular Europe is more secular than the rest of the world although it does have a considerable amount of religious immigrants who have higher birth rates (see: Atheist population and Global atheism).

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently reported:

Based on the latest estimates in European Union countries, overweight affects 30-70% and obesity affects 10-30% of adults.

Estimates of the number of overweight infants and children in the WHO European Region rose steadily from 1990 to 2008. Over 60% of children who are overweight before puberty will be overweight in early adulthood.[93]

Atheistic China and obesity

China has the largest atheist population in the world.[94] In 2014, the British medical journal Lancet reported that the Chinese now have the second highest obesity rate in the world.[95] A recent study published in the Obesity Reviews journal, found that Chinese teenagers' rate of diabetes was four times that of their American peers.[96] See: Atheism and obesity
See also: Atheistic China and obesity

In 2014, it was reported that China's obesity rate has skyrocketed in the last 30 years and the Chinese now have the second highest obesity rate in the world.[97] The Wall Street Journal reported in 2014 that China had approximately 300 million overweight people.[98] In 2014, the British medical journal Lancet analyzed weight trends in 188 countries and reported that more than 28% of Chinese adult men and 27% of the country’s adult women are now overweight or obese.[99]

According to a 2012 report by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of obese children in China has reached 120 million.[100] A recent study published in the Obesity Reviews journal, found that Chinese teenagers' rate of diabetes was four times that of their American peers.[101] Due to their past one-child policy, which had exceptions, China now has a lot of over-pampered and over-fed children.[102]

Matthew Crabbe, co-author of "Fat China: How Expanding Waistlines are Changing a Nation" declared that China's surging rate of obesity is "a ticking bomb" underneath the country's future economic growth and healthcare system.[103]

In 2014, The Economist declared in an article entitled Chubby little emperors:

MORE than 2,000 years ago “Huangdi Neijing”, a classic Chinese medical text, identified obesity as a disease caused by eating too much “fatty meats and polished grains”. Until a generation ago such a diet was an extravagance beyond imagination for all but the elite. But the Chinese waistline has since expanded, and at an alarming rate.

More than a quarter of the adult population, or roughly 350m people, is overweight or obese (more than 60m squeeze into the latter camp). That is at least twice as many as are under-nourished. With rising incomes and more diverse diets, Chinese people are consuming much more fatty food and fizzy drinks. Meals now contain more than twice as much oil and meats as in the 1980s.

This is producing a health calamity, both in heart disease (which now accounts for over a third of deaths) and in a less-noticed explosion of diabetes, which is closely linked to obesity. The prevalence of diabetes has grown more than tenfold during the past three decades. According to a recent national survey, 11.6% of Chinese adults are diabetic, a share almost as high as in America, whose obesity rate is much greater.

With a catastrophic famine still in living memory, it is little surprise that Chinese people have developed a taste for foods rich in fats and sugars.[104]

A recent study published in the Obesity Reviews journal, found that Chinese teenagers' rate of diabetes was four times that of their American peers.[105]

United States: Religion/irreligion and obesity

Nate Phelps spoke at the 2009 American Atheists convention.[106][107] (photo obtained from Flickr, see license agreement), Title: Nate Phelps AAC00 (a very brave man)

According to the Gallup Inc., "Very religious Americans are more likely to practice healthy behaviors than those who are moderately religious or nonreligious."[108]

Gallup further declares:

Very religious Americans make healthier choices than their moderately religious and nonreligious counterparts across all four of the Healthy Behavior Index metrics, including smoking, healthy eating, and regular exercise. Smoking is one area of particular differentiation between the very religious and less religious Americans, with the nonreligious 85% more likely to be smokers than those who are very religious.[109]

A 2010 study reported in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion found that for Korean women living in California, religion "may help prevent obesity."[110]

Irreligion/religion, recent generations in the United States and obesity

See also: Irreligion/religion, recent generations in the United States and obesity

In the United States at the present time, the greater the degree of irreligiosity in a generation, the higher their obesity rate is. For more information, please see the three articles directly below.

Irreligion, various generations in the United States and obesity rates

Atheist organizations/groups and obesity

Sloth and atheistic responses to theistic arguments

Dr. Greg Bahnsen became known as "the man atheists fear most" due to Michael Martin's cancellation of their scheduled debate.[111][112]

See also: Rebuttals to atheist arguments

Poor efforts as far as atheistic response to contemporary work in the philosophy of religion

In 1990, the atheist philosopher Michael Martin indicated there was a general absence of an atheistic response to contemporary work in the philosophy of religion and in jest he indicated that it was his "cross to bear" to respond to theistic arguments.[113] Yet, in 1994, Michael Martin was criticized for his eleventh hour cancellation of his debate with Greg Bahnsen (see: Greg Bahnsen and debate and Bahnson-Martin debate press release).[114][115]

Atheist debaters are often unprepared and do poorly in debates

See also: Atheism and debate

Atheist debaters frequently are unprepared and do poorly in debates (See: Atheism and debate).

For example, at the atheist blog Common Sense Atheism, the atheist Luke Muehlhauser said of the William Lane Craig vs. Doug Jesseph debate: "A very typical debate in which Craig’s opponent is not prepared for Craig’s skill, speed, or organization, and things just get worse for Jesseph as things go along and he falls further and further behind."[116]

In recent years, there have been notable examples of prominent atheists dodging debate offers (See also: Atheism and cowardice).

Christian historical arguments, atheist sloth and atheist historical revisionism

It is common for atheists to be ignorant about history and to also engage in historical revisionism with the aim of distorting the historical record (see: Atheists and historical illiteracy and Atheism and historical revisionism).[117]

Despite there being an abundance of historical evidence for Jesus Christ living in the first century, many atheists claim the Jesus never existed (see: Historicity of Jesus).

In an article entitled Scholarly opinions on the Jesus Myth, Christopher Price wrote concerning individuals who insist that Jesus Christ was merely a mythical figure:

I have often been asked why more academics do not take the time to respond to the Jesus Myth theory. After looking into this question, I discovered that most historians and New Testament scholars relevant to the topic have concluded that Jesus Mythers are beyond reason and therefore decide that they have better things to do with their time.[118]

For more information, please see: Atheists and the denial that Jesus existed

New Atheism arrogance and intellectual sloth

See also: Atheism and arrogance
Richard Dawkins
The Oxford University Professor Daniel Came wrote to the New Atheist Richard Dawkins:: "The absence of a debate with the foremost apologist for Christian theism is a glaring omission on your CV and is of course apt to be interpreted as cowardice on your part."[119]

Using special text analysis software, the social psychologist Jonathan Haidt found that new atheists very often wrote in dogmatic terms in their major works using words such as “always,” “never,” “certainly,” “every,” and “undeniable.”[120] Of the 75,000 words in Sam Harris's The End of Faith, 2.24% of them connote or are associated with certainty.[121]

Despite the frequent expressions of certainty by new atheists. New Atheism has a reputation for shallow arguments. A frequent occurrence is that the works of new atheists often betray an amateurish knowledge of philosophy/religion.[122][123]

Atheist philosopher Dr. Michael Ruse declared concerning new atheist Richard Dawkins' book The God Delusion: "The God Delusion makes me embarrassed to be an atheist."[124]

Vox Day's book The Irrational atheist found multiple errors in reasoning and factual errors when it came to the works of new atheist authors.[125] See also: Atheism and irrationality

Atheists, evolution and poorly constructed arguments

See also: Evolution

evolution darwin theory
Late in Charles Darwin's life, Darwin told the Duke of Argyll that he frequently had overwhelming thoughts that the natural world was the result of design.[126]

Since World War II a majority of the most prominent and vocal defenders of the evolutionary position which employs methodological naturalism have been atheists and agnostics (see also: Causes of evolutionary belief)[127]

Evolution is a pseudoscience. The atheist philosopher of science Michael Ruse said "Evolution is a religion. This was true of evolution in the beginning, and it is true of evolution still today."[128] In the their Question evolution! campaign, Creation Ministries International asserts that evolution is a religion.[129] See also: Evolution as a secular origins myth

Evolutionists have had a number of notable cases of engaging in unfounded speculation and promoting frauds (see: Evolution and Cases of Fraud, Hoaxes and Speculation).

In addition, evolutionists commonly use easily debunked arguments and leading biblical creationist organizations have published lists of arguments that evolutionists should not use.[130][131]

Creation scientists tend to win creation vs. evolution debates and after losing many debates in the 1970s, evolutionists tend to dodge debate offers (see: Creation scientists tend to win debates with evolutionists). Dr. Henry Morris said regarding the creation scientist Duane Gish (who had over 300 formal debates): “At least in our judgment and that of most in the audiences, he always wins.”[132]

See also

See also

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