Aunt Phillis's Cabin

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Aunt Phillis's Cabin; Or, Southern Life As It Is
Auntphillis.jpg
Title page from the original 1852 edition
Author Mary Henderson Eastman
Year Published 1852
Language English

Aunt Phillis's Cabin; Or, Southern Life As It Is (also known as simply Aunt Phillis's Cabin) was a novel written by Mary Henderson Eastman in reaction to Uncle Tom's Cabin, and was first published in 1852, the same year Uncle Tom's Cabin first appeared in book form.

Contents

Overview

Aunt Phillis's Cabin was one of several pro-slavery novels that were written in response to Uncle Tom's Cabin, which was seen in the South of the United States as inaccurately depicting the concept of slaveholding[1]. Eight of these novels were published in 1852 alone[2], with Aunt Phillis's Cabin being among the first.

Plot

Aunt Phillis's Cabin follows the social lives on a plantation somewhere in Virginia. The black slaves - here presented as being loyal to their benign, caring masters - are pious, temperamental, and happy, claiming that it was the will of the Lord God to make them slaves. Eastman supports this argument by citing areas of the Bible throughout her book, including Genesis 9:27[3] and various sections from the Book of Deuteronomy.[4]

See Also

References

  1. http://www.enotes.com/uncle-toms/
  2. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4113/is_200501/ai_n9483519/
  3. Preface to Aunt Phillis's Cabin - M.H. Eastman (1852)
  4. Preface to Aunt Phillis's Cabin - M.H. Eastman (1852)

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