Ben Zobrist

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Ben Zobrist

Benjamin Thomas "Ben" Zobrist (born May 26, 1981[1]) is a major league baseball player who is most famous for being named the 2016 World Series MVP when his team, the Chicago Cubs won the Series. He is the first Chicago Cub ever to win a World Series MVP.[2]

Biography

Zobrist was born on May 26, 1981 in Eureka, Illinois.[1] His father is the pastor of the Liberty Bible Church, and his older sister works at a Christian camp.[3] He attended Olivet Nazarene University and then transferred to Dallas Baptist University.[3]

Zobrist was first drafted to the Houston Astros in 2004.[1] He became the 2016 World Series MVP of the Chicago Cubs. In that year, the Cubs won the World Series for the first time in 108 years.[4]

Christian faith

Zobrist is a strong Christian and used his fame and his team's victory to spread the gospel.[5][6] That important fact was ignored by the mainstream media.

Personal life

Zobrist is married to his wife Julianna, a Christian singer, and together they have three children.[7]

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Ben Zobrist. baseball-reference.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  2. Stephen, Eric (November 3, 2016). Ben Zobrist named 2016 World Series MVP. sbnation.com. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Topkin, Marc (July 13, 2009). Tampa Bay Rays' Ben Zobrist has taken a surprising path to today's All-Star Game. Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  4. Martin, Jill (November 3, 2016). Believe it! Chicago Cubs end the curse, win 2016 World Series. CNN. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  5. Haverluck, Michael F. (November 6, 2016). Cubs' World Series MVP: 'We all need Christ'. OneNewsNow. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  6. Torres, Hazel (November 5, 2016). Chicago Cubs' Ben Zobrist, World Series MVP and Baseball 'Missionary,' Says 'We All Need Christ'. Christianity Today. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  7. Dwojak, Michal (May 30, 2016). Singer Julianna Zobrist (Ben's wife) on the Cubs, walk-up songs, six-day rule. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved November 20, 2016.

External links