C. Wade Meade

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Carroll Wade Meade

(Louisiana Tech University historian)

Dr. C. Wade Meade.jpg

Born October 9, 1932
Dripping Springs
Hays County, Texas
Died October 27, 2015
Spouse Marie Meade Thompson (divorced)

Carroll Wade Meade (October 9, 1932 – October 27, 2015)[1] was an historian of European and Middle Eastern studies who spent most of his academic career, from 1967 to 2006, at Louisiana Tech University in Ruston, Louisiana.

Meade was born near Dripping Springs in Hays County near Austin in central Texas but reared in Pollock in Grant Parish north of Alexandria, Louisiana. He graduated in 1950 from Pollock High School and subsequently received a Bachelor of Science in Geology and in 1961 a Master of Arts in History from Louisiana Tech. His thesis[2] is entitled The Cook Mountain Formation of Lincoln Parish, Louisiana. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Texas in Austin. His dissertation is entitled American Assyriology: Its Growth and Development.[3]

Meade served in the United States Marine Corps during the Korean War, in which capacity he received the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Medal, and the Louisiana Veterans Honor Medal.[2]

Meade wrote five history books, including in 1974 The Road to Babylon.[4] In 1980, he published Ruins of Rome: A Guide to Classical Antiquities.[5] In 1987, he published Egyptology and Rome: A Handbook for Students of Egyptian Archaeology in Rome.[6] In 2013, he published Seat of the World : The Palatine of Ancient Rome.[7] He was working on a sixth book at the time of his death in Tyler, Texas, which occurred shortly after his 83rd birthday.[2]

At Louisiana Tech, Meade held the Garnie W. McGinty Chair of History, named for a former department chairman. He was the history museum director too.[2] From 1970 to 2000, he taught history and archaeology in the Louisiana Tech-Rome studies program abroad. After retiring from Louisiana Tech, he taught from 2007 to 2013 at the University of Texas at Tyler in Smith County.[7]

Meade's former wife, Marie (born 1936) of Monroe, Louisiana, subsequently married William Young Thompson (1922-2013), the former chairman of the Louisiana Tech History Department. Wade and Marie Meade had two children, Dawn Meade of Houston, Texas, and Don Alan Meade (born January 1959) of Shreveport, Louisiana. He was cremated. His memorial service was held on November 7, 2015, at the University Center Theatre at Louisiana State University in Shreveport.[2]

Elizabeth K. "Beth" Womack of Ruston, a former Meade student, described him as: "so young at heart and full of life. It was a blessing to be able to share a few years of his life. He shared so much information with his students and genuinely loved to educate. He was such a character, and I will miss him dearly."[8]

See also

Two other Louisiana Tech historians:

References

  1. Dr. C. Wade Meade. Stewart Family Funeral Home. Retrieved on November 28, 2015.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 C. Wade Meade obituary. Tyler Morning Telegraph (November 1, 2015). Retrieved on November 28, 2015.
  3. Carroll Wade Meade. University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved on November 29, 2015.
  4. C. Wade Meade. The Alcalde (July 1974). Retrieved on November 28, 2015.
  5. (1980) Ruins of Rome: A Guide to Classical Antiquities. Ruston, Louisiana: Palatine Publications. ISBN 9780936638003. Retrieved on November 28, 2015. 
  6. C. Wade Meade (1987). Egyptology and Rome: A Handbook for Students of Egyptian Archaeology in Rome. Palatine. ISBN 9780936638270. Retrieved on November 28, 2015. 
  7. 7.0 7.1 C. Wade Meade (2013). Seat of the World: The Palatine of Ancient Rome. abebooks. ISBN 9788882657680. Retrieved on November 28, 2015. 
  8. Life Tributes Page: C. Wade Meade. Stewart Family Funeral Home. Retrieved on November 28, 2015.