Chechnya

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Нохчийн Республика
Chechen Republic
Chechnya.png

Flag of Chechen Republic

Capital Grozny
Government Puppet Dictatorship
Official Language Russian, Chechen
President Ramzan Kadyrov
Prime Minister Odes Baysultanov
Area 15,300 km²
Population (2002 estimate) 1,103,686

The Chechen Republic, also known as Chechnya, is a Russian-occupied republic encompassing located in the North Caucasus mountain region. It borders the Russian republics of Ingushetia, North Ossetia, Dagestan, Stavropol Krai, as well as the pro-Western nation of Georgia to the south.

During the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Dzhokar Dudayev, a former Soviet Air Force general, led the Chechen people to declare independence from Russia, as the Chechens had been under Russian occupation for over a century. However, in December 1994, Boris Yeltsin turned against his promises of Chechen soverignty, and invaded the repblic to restore Russian rule. The Chechen people defeated the Russians in the First Chechen War, and gained de facto independence in 1996.

After a series of apartment bombings which were blamed on Chechen freedom-fighters by the Russian government (but which evidence points to as coordinated by the Russian FSB, the successor to the Soviet KGB), Russian forces under dictator Vladimir Putin invaded Chechnya once again, culminating in a genocidal campaign in which as many as a quarter-million Chechen civilians may have been murdered. Putin has installed a puppet dictatorship by appointing the brutal pro-Kremlin warlord Ramzan Kadyrov as President of Chechnya. Nevertheless, freedom fighters continue to operate against the Russian occupation today.

American neoconservatives such as Richard Pipes have spoken out on the cause of Chechen freedom [1] Similar to the liberation of Kosovo, conservatives throughout the United States have called for Chechnya to be a free and independent nation.[2]

The terrorists from the Boston Marathon bombing where originally from Chechnya, but had been in the United States legally. The younger had become a naturalized citizen last year, while the older held a valid green card.[3]

References

  1. [1]
  2. [2]
  3. http://www.cnn.com/2013/04/19/us/massachusetts-bombers-profiles/index.html
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