China and obesity

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China has the largest atheist population in the world.[1] In 2014, the British medical journal Lancet reported that the Chinese now have the second highest obesity rate in the world.[2][3] A recent study published in the Obesity Reviews journal, found that Chinese teenagers' rate of diabetes was four times that of their American peers.[4]

In 2014, it was reported that China's obesity rate has skyrocketed in the last 30 years and the Chinese now have the second highest obesity rate in the world.[5][6] The Wall Street Journal reported in 2014 that China had approximately 300 million overweight people.[7] In 2014, the British medical journal Lancet analyzed weight trends in 188 countries and reported that more than 28% of Chinese adult men and 27% of the country’s adult women are now overweight or obese.[8]

According to a 2012 report by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of obese children in China has reached 120 million.[9] A recent study published in the Obesity Reviews journal, found that Chinese teenagers' rate of diabetes was four times that of their American peers.[10] Due to their past one-child policy, which had exceptions, China now has a lot of over-pampered and over-fed children.[11]

Matthew Crabbe, co-author of "Fat China: How Expanding Waistlines are Changing a Nation" declared that China's surging rate of obesity is "a ticking bomb" underneath the country's future economic growth and healthcare system.[12]

In 2014, The Economist declared in an article entitled Chubby little emperors:

MORE than 2,000 years ago “Huangdi Neijing”, a classic Chinese medical text, identified obesity as a disease caused by eating too much “fatty meats and polished grains”. Until a generation ago such a diet was an extravagance beyond imagination for all but the elite. But the Chinese waistline has since expanded, and at an alarming rate.

More than a quarter of the adult population, or roughly 350m people, is overweight or obese (more than 60m squeeze into the latter camp). That is at least twice as many as are under-nourished. With rising incomes and more diverse diets, Chinese people are consuming much more fatty food and fizzy drinks. Meals now contain more than twice as much oil and meats as in the 1980s.

This is producing a health calamity, both in heart disease (which now accounts for over a third of deaths) and in a less-noticed explosion of diabetes, which is closely linked to obesity. The prevalence of diabetes has grown more than tenfold during the past three decades. According to a recent national survey, 11.6% of Chinese adults are diabetic, a share almost as high as in America, whose obesity rate is much greater.

With a catastrophic famine still in living memory, it is little surprise that Chinese people have developed a taste for foods rich in fats and sugars.[13]

China and Western style food restaurants and China has rapidly become the largest beer market

In China, there is a growing amount of westernized style food establishments that can be found in most reasonably size cities.[14] In addition, China has rapidly become the largest market for beer.[15]

China, atheism, growth of Christianity and obesity

See also: Atheism and obesity

China has the world's largest atheist population.[16][17]

Obesity is positively associated with impulsiveness, lower self-discipline and neuroticism.[18] In the journal article Religion, self-regulation, and self-control: Associations, explanations, and implications, psychologists McCullough and Willoughby theorize that many of the positive links of religiousness with health and social behavior may be caused by religion's beneficial influences on self-control/self-regulation.[19][20] Furthermore, a 2012 Queen's University study published in Psychological Science found that religion replenishes self-control.[21][22] Also, numerous studies indicate that those who engage in regular spiritual practices have lower mortality rates.[23][24] Accordingly, one of the positive effects of the Christianization of China which is presently occurring (see: Global Christianity) is the positive effect it has on people's health practices (see also: Atheism and health).

Many nations with a Christian heritage or who are increasingly adopting Christianity are prosperous due to the contributions that Christianity brings to science, technology, economics and a nation's work ethic (see: Christianity and science and Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism and Atheism and economics).[25] It is often thought that the increased prosperity of Chins is significantly due to its increased Christianization.[26] While increased wealth and education has the potential improve a person's health (better quality of food, increased education about nutrition, etc.), some individuals abuse their economic prosperity which can have a negative effect on their health (see: Western ungodliness, prosperity, decadence and obesity).

For more information, please see: Atheism and obesity

China and Western style food restaurants and China has rapidly become the largest beer market

In China, there is a growing amount of westernized style food establishments that can be found in most reasonably size cities.[27] In addition, China has rapidly become the largest market for beer.[28]

All you can eat buffets in China

All you can eat buffets in China are called 自助餐 (zi zhu can). They typically have Western food as well as Chinese food and are found in large cities such Shanghai, Beijing, Guangzhou, Qingdao, etc.[29]

In the Grand View Mall Guangzhou, China they have a place called Las Vegas Buffet. In Guangzhou, they also have several Brazilian meat buffets where they come patrons tables and slice meat of a skewer (This also includes an all you can eat buffet).[30]

See also


Various generations and rates of irreligion/obesity:

External links

Notes

  1. As Obesity Rises, Chinese Kids Are Almost as Fat as Americans, Wall Street Journal Chinarealtime, May 29, 2014
  2. Chubby China: Nation of 300 Million Overweight People
  3. Obesity is a growing concern in China By Pang Li, China.org.cn, September 14, 2012
  4. As Obesity Rises, Chinese Kids Are Almost as Fat as Americans, Wall Street Journal Chinarealtime, May 29, 2014
  5. Chubby China: Nation of 300 Million Overweight People
  6. Chubby China: Nation of 300 Million Overweight People
  7. As Obesity Rises, Chinese Kids Are Almost as Fat as Americans, Wall Street Journal Chinarealtime, May 29, 2014
  8. Child Obesity Reaches 120 Million in China
  9. Obesity is a growing concern in China By Pang Li, China.org.cn, September 14, 2012
  10. Rising Chinese Child Obesity and Fat Camps
  11. Obesity is a growing concern in China By Pang Li, China.org.cn, September 14, 2012
  12. Chubby little emperors, The Economist, June 14th 2014|BEIJING|From the print edition
  13. China’s public health crisis The Spectator, Dr. Nick Summerton 25 August 2014 11:08
  14. China’s public health crisis The Spectator, Dr. Nick Summerton 25 August 2014 11:08
  15. Top 50 Countries With Highest Proportion of Atheists / Agnostics (Zuckerman, 2005)
  16. A surprising map of where the world’s atheists live, Washington Post By Max Fisher and Caitlin Dewey May 23, 2013
  17. Religion, Self-Regulation, and Self-Control: Associations, Explanations, and Implications
  18. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19210054
  19. [Religion Replenishes Self-Control, Psychological Science, June 2012 vol. 23 no. 6 635-642, Kevin Rounding, Albert Lee, Jill A. Jacobson and Li-Jun Ji at Queen’s University]
  20. Study finds religion helps us gain self-control
  21. Religious involvement and mortality: a meta-analytic review. McCullough ME, Hoyt WT, Larson DB, Koenig HG, Thoresen C., Health Psychol. 2000 May;19(3):211-22.
  22. The role of spirituality in health care, roc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2001 October; 14(4): 352–357.
  23. The Protestant Work Ethic: Alive & Well…In China
  24. The Protestant Work Ethic: Alive & Well…In China
  25. China’s public health crisis The Spectator, Dr. Nick Summerton 25 August 2014 11:08
  26. China’s public health crisis The Spectator, Dr. Nick Summerton 25 August 2014 11:08
  27. Are there all you can eat buffets in China?
  28. Are there all you can eat buffets in China?