Christian Democratic Party (Norway)

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The Norwegian Christian Democratic Party (Norwegian: Kristelig Folkeparti, KrF) was founded in 1933 in response to growing secularism in Norway. They claim to be a society that:

  1. protects life and human dignity, equality and diversity
  2. respects man's material and spiritual needs
  3. promotes sustainable development, and includes everyone in a more just distribution of earthly resources, characterized by love for our fellow neighbours, and solidarity with the poor and persecuted in other countries.

History

The Christian Democratic Party aimed to be an alternative to existing political parties in Norway, which were largely secular. A few months after the party's founding, its first candidate, Nils Lavik, was elected to parliament. During the years of Nazi occupation in the early 1940s, interest in a Christian party spiked amongst members of the Norwegian public who had seen the atrocities of the Nazis. In the first election after World War II, the Party won 8 seats in the parliament.

The Party became a member of a short-lived non-socialistic government along with 3 other parties (two conservative and one liberal). These parties held a majority of seats in the parliament from 1965-1971. In the years between 1970-1990, the Party maintained a small percentage of seats in the parliament, receiving roughly 10% of the popular vote in most elections.

Political Issues

The Christian Democratic Party is notably environmentalist. Its docrtine states "Stewardship implies that the resources of the Earth should be taken care of for the best of present and future generations."[1] The doctrine also takes aspects of liberalism and socialism, stating that "Christian Democracy sees man as both an individual human being, and as part of a community."[1]

The Party also respects separation of church and state. Their webpage states, "The Christian Democrats are inspired by the Bible and by Christian tradition, yet it is important to maintain that religion and politics exist on two different levels. Salvation is the goal of Christianity, whereas the goal of politics is to create a good society for all, regardless of religious conviction. The aim of the Christian Democratic ideology is democracy in which diversity and the respect for individuals and their different choices are among the most important values."[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Norwegian Christian Democratic Party Official Website
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