Cobalt

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Cobalt
Name Cobalt
Symbol Co
Atomic number 27
Atomic mass 58.9 amu
Normal state Solid
Classification Transition metal
Crystal structure Hexagonal
Color Silver
Date of discovery 1737
Name of discoverer George Brandt
Name origin From the German kobold.
Uses In magnets, medical radio-isotopes and (as a compound) blue or green pigment in ceramics and glasses.
Obtained from Cobaltine, erythrite, glaucodot, and skutterudite.

Cobalt (KO-bolt) is a lustrous, silvery-blue metal which is magnetic.[1]

Properties

Melting Point: 2723°F (1495°C or 1768 K)

Boiling Point: 5301°F (2927°C or 3200 K)

Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter

State of matter at Room Temperature: Solid[2]

Cobalt is a hard, brittle metal, which is similar in appearance to iron and nickel.[3]

History

The tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, who ruled from 1361-1352 BC, contained a small glass object colored deep blue with cobalt. Cobalt blue was known even earlier in China and was used for pottery glazes.[4] Modern cobalt was officially discovered by a Swedish chemist named Georg Brandt, in 1739. [5]

Uses

Cobalt is used in several alloys, including Alnico. These alloys are used in things like jet turbines and gas turbine generators. Cobalt salts have been used for centuries to give pottery and other items a blue color. Radioactive cobalt-60 is also useful to treat cancer and in some countries, to irradiate food for preservation. [6]

References

  1. http://www.rsc.org/periodic-table/element/27/cobalt
  2. http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele027.html
  3. http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementfacts/a/cobalt.htm
  4. http://www.rsc.org/periodic-table/element/27/cobalt
  5. http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele027.html
  6. http://www.rsc.org/periodic-table/element/27/cobalt