Cultural Marxism

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Cultural Marxism is a branch of Marxist ideology which had its origins the early part of the twentieth century. It emerged as a response of European Marxist intellectuals disillusioned by the early political failures of conventional economic Marxist ideology.[note 1]

The central idea of Cultural Marxism is to soften up and prepare Western Civilization for economic Marxism after a gradual, relentless, sustained attack on every institution of Western culture, including schools, literature, art, film, the Judeo-Christian religious tradition, the family, sexual mores, etc.[note 2] The attacks are usually framed in Marxist terms as a class struggle between oppressors and oppressed; the members of the latter class allegedly include women, minorities, homosexuals, and adherents of non-Western religions such as Islam.

While Marx's Communist Manifesto focused on the alleged class struggle between bourgeois (owners of the means of production) and proletariat (workers), Marx did address culture, which he intimated would change after his economic vision was implemented.

Notes

  1. cf. External source: Cultural Marxism: The Corruption of America is a James Jaeger Film with ambition to show how a love affair with collectivist ideologies has lead to ever bigger government and the welfare-warfare state. Lead by a Marxist splinter group called the "Frankfurt School" -- "the long march through the institutions" has infiltrated every corner of Western culture to corrupt traditional Christian values with "political correctness," another name for "cultural Marxism."
  2. cf. The tendency of dictatorial ideologies to influence public institutions etc. so that these would serve their agendas is termed as Gleichschaltung.

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