Daniel Akaka

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Daniel Akaka
Akaka.jpg
Former U.S. Senator from Hawaii
From: May 16, 1990 - January 3, 2013
PredecessorSpark Matsunaga
SuccessorMazie Hirono
U.S. Representative from Hawaii's 2nd District
From: January 3, 1977 – May 15, 1990
PredecessorSpark Matsunaga
SuccessorPatsy Mink
Information
Party Democrat
Spouse(s) Mary Mildred Chong
Religion United Church of Christ

Daniel Akaka, born September 11, 1924 (age 89) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Hawaii. He was elected to the House of Representatives from the Second Congressional District of Hawaii in 1971, and was reelected until 1988. Akaka was appointed to the U.S. Senate to fill the seat left empty by the death of former United States Senator Spark M. Matsunaga.

In April 2006, he was selected by Time magazine as one of "America's Five Worst Senators." [1] The article criticized him for mainly authoring minor legislation, calling him "master of the minor resolution and the bill that dies in committee."

During his 2006 Senate reelection campaign, Akaka faced a primary challenge by Congressman Ed Case. Akaka won the Democratic primary by eight percentage points and went on to win the general election by twenty-six points.

Daniel Akaka votes with the Democrats 96.1% of the time. [2] In February 2009, he voted for President Obama's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. "This vital legislation will create jobs." [3] In November 2009 Akaka stated that he was not aware of the Constitution giving Congress the authority to make individuals purchase health insurance, as health care bills in both the House and Senate require. [4]

Akaka announced on March 2, 2011, that he would not seek another term as senator.[5]

Committee Membership

As of 2009, Akaka serves on the following Senate committees:

  • Armed Services
  • Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
  • Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
  • Indian Affairs
  • Veterans' Affairs
  • Congressional Task Force on Native Hawaiian Issues

He previously served on the Select Committee on Ethics.

External Links

References

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