Democrats (Brazil)

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Democrats
Party leader José Agripino Maia
Parliamentary leader
Founded September 11, 1986
Headquarters
Political ideology Right-wing[1]
Political position Fiscal: Free market[2]
Social: Liberal conservative[3]
International affiliation International Democrat Union and Centrist Democrat International
Color(s) blue, green and white
Website dem.org.br

Democrats (in Portuguese: Democratas, DEM) is the most right-wing political party on the brazilian political spectrum.[1] It is the main opposition party to the Marxist government of the Workers Party, along with the center-left Brazilian Social Democracy Party and the leftist Popular Socialist Party. Nevertheless, his best-known names are more centrist than the libertarian/conservative wing of the party.[4] His biggest right-wing representative is the Senator Ronaldo Caiado, member of the controversial Rural Democratic Union.

Founded in 1985 under the name of the Liberal[5] Front Party (Partido da Frente Liberal, PFL), the party was a wing of the old National Renewal Alliance who advocated limited government, while ARENA was adept of neoconservatism and big government. When the Brazilian military regime ended, this wing has evolved into a party that got his record in September 11, 1986. Its founder, the christian evangelical fiscal conservative economist Arolde de Oliveira, left the party in 2011 along with other dissidents to form the moderate Social Democratic Party, which advocates a combination of economic freedom and welfare.

The party is, according to an unreliable survey of an NGO, the party with the most cassafoes by political corruption in Brazil. However, the libertarian and conservative party leaders expelled all these corrupt politicians and classified they as "bandits who have tarnished our name and history".[6] While the far-left ruling Worker's Party boasts its convicted corrupt politicians and treats them as heroes.[7]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Turn to the right, Viomundo.com.br - November 10, 2010
  2. Interview with Jorge Bornhausen to Veja in 2006 - VEJA Magazine
  3. DEM leader, Senator Demosthenes Torres says opposition colleagues have hit head, EXAME - December 2, 2012
  4. The PFL unequivocal decline, Papo Político - August 13, 2010
  5. In Brazil, the term liberal is used to refer to libertarianism and classical liberalism.
  6. While the DEM expelled their corrupt; PT defends and honors, Renato Ferreira 10/27/2012
  7. PT repeated "monthly allowance" and is suspected of corrupt in Petrobrás a wronged hero, VEJA Magazine - 11.29.2014

See also