Essay: If you're so smart PZ Myers, then why are you so fat?

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Perhaps if the atheist PZ Myers drank more Slimfast and less beer, he would have had a trimmer figure in this picture.

PZ Myers appears to have a problem with intellectual slothfulness[1] and perhaps his slothfulness applies to his "exercise habits" as well. As of December 26, 2010, Conservapedia is not aware of PZ Myers endorsing any exercise equipment.

(photo obtained from Flickr, see license agreement)

A 2010 picture taken in Australia shows atheist PZ Myers drinking ale/beer and he had excess weight in his abdominal area.[1] In 2010, PZ Myers had health problems related to his heart.[2] In addition, medical science research indicates that excess weight impairs brain function.[3][4] Given PZ Myers' biological training and the wide dissemination of the health effects of being overweight in terms of cardiovascular health and brain function, it is unfortunate that preventative medicine was not used in greater measure in terms of his health.[5][6][7] PZ Myers inattention to diligently implementing the recommendations of nutritional science, exercise science, and medical science is not entirely surprising given his vehement advocacy of evolutionary pseudoscience. There have been a number of notable evolutionists who have been overweight.

Of course, since atheists often claim as a group they are above average in intelligence, this raises two questions: Are atheists "smarter than the average bear"? Also, what is the difference between wisdom and intelligence?

Please see: Are atheists "smarter than the average bear"?

Contents

Physical and mental health related problems associated with being overweight and/or obese

Medical science research indicates that excess weight impairs brain function.[8][9][10][11][12]

See also: Atheism and Mental and Physical Health and Atheism and obesity

Some of the medical conditions associated with obesity include: type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides, coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, arthritis, cancer, sleep apnea, reproductive problems in women and varicose veins.[13][14][15][16] In addition, medical science research indicates that excess weight impairs brain function.[17][18][19][20][21]

According to the Mayo Clinic some of the symptoms associated with obesity can include:

  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Snoring
  • Sleep apnea
  • Pain in your back or joints
  • Excessive sweating
  • Always feeling hot
  • Rashes or infection in folds of your skin
  • Feeling out of breath with minor exertion
  • Daytime sleepiness or fatigue

Obesity and the feet/ankles: According to Stuart D. Miller, M.D.: "It is important for the public to know that obesity isn't just an aesthetic issue, but a contributing cause of musculoskeletal health problems, specifically with the feet and ankles."[23]

Lower levels of balance recovery and increased risk of falls: In her thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, entitled A modeling investigation of obesity and balance recovery, Sara Louise Matrangola writes in the abstract: "Obesity is associated with an increased risk of falls and subsequent injury. Previous studies have shown weight loss and strength training to be beneficial to balance, but knowing which is more beneficial will allow researchers to design interventions to maximize the benefits in terms of balance and reducing risk of falls."[24]

Are atheists smarter than the average bear?

Are atheists smarter than the average bear?

Dr. Joseph Thomas Kennedy

"The truth of God's existence is the benchmark from which all landmarks are located. The truth of God's existence is the foundation on which all truth rests. God existed before evil existed, and God will exist after evil is annihilated. To deny the existence of God is an act of insanity so severe that God says that person is a fool (Psalm 14:1; 53:1)." - Dr. Joseph Thomas Kennedy

Articles on atheism and intelligence

Wisdom versus intelligence

See also

Other external links

Notes

  1. http://www.flickr.com/photos/reuvenim/4426093513/
  2. http://scienceblogs.com/pharyngula/2010/08/thats_not_a_heart_its_a_flaili.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+scienceblogs%2Fpharyngula+%28Pharyngula%29&utm_content=Google+Reader
  3. http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/41/18/25.1.full
  4. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2009/08/25/as-waistlines-widen-brains-shrink.html
  5. http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/41/18/25.1.full
  6. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2009/08/25/as-waistlines-widen-brains-shrink.html
  7. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21121834
  8. http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/41/18/25.1.full
  9. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2009/08/25/as-waistlines-widen-brains-shrink.html
  10. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21167850
  11. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714112832.htm
  12. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/instance/2568718/
  13. http://www.webmd.com/diet/tc/obesity-health-risks-of-obesity
  14. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_consequences.htm
  15. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/obesity
  16. http://stanfordhospital.org/clinicsmedServices/COE/surgicalServices/vascularSurgery/patientEducation/varicose.html
  17. http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/content/41/18/25.1.full
  18. http://health.usnews.com/health-news/family-health/brain-and-behavior/articles/2009/08/25/as-waistlines-widen-brains-shrink.html
  19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21167850
  20. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714112832.htm
  21. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/instance/2568718/
  22. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/obesity/DS00314/DSECTION=symptoms
  23. Survey Suggests Obesity May Cause Foot Problems
  24. Thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, entitled A modeling investigation of obesity and balance recoveryby Sara Louise Matrangola
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