Examples of Bias in Wikipedia: Conspiracy theories

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This article lists examples of Bias in Wikipedia, related to conspiracy theories they just made up.

  1. In Wikipedia's page on the ABC's docudrama The Path to 9/11, the page contains a section titles "Controversy and criticisms," which contains 19 sub-sections to support it, while the section titled "Controversy: support for The Path to 9/11" only contains four, despite the fact that the controversy was sparked by pro-Clinton liberals that failed to see the fact that the two-part miniseries criticized both Bush and Clinton administrations leading up to 9/11 and that writer Cyrus Nowrasteh stated that many of their consultants on it stated that the docudrama went easy on Clinton. It also fails to note John Ziegler's documentary on the censoring of the docudrama Blocking the Path to 9/11 [2], which contains interviews with many people on the topic, and points out how the MSM liberals and Clintons have smeared it so much that it has kept it from ever being shown on TV or being sold on DVD in the near-future. [3]
  2. The Wikipedia article on the Trilateral Commission makes fun of conspiracy theories instead of presenting them factually with references on both sides of the argument.
  3. The Wikipedia article "List of consipracy theories" ridicules and dismisses as "conspiracy theories" more hypotheses advanced by conservative thinkers than hypotheses advanced by left wing thinkers. The editor(s) of this page have an obvious liberal bias that hold in disfavor a number of ideas advanced by conservatives. For example, Water Fluoridation has been opposed by many conservative groups due to concerns about health impacts as well as a question of personal freedom and limits on the proper scope of government. Yet, the Wikipedia list dismisses these views as a "conspiracy theory" that draws on "distrust of experts and unease about medicine and science". In another example, peak oil is a theory advanced by many conservatives including geologist T. Boone Pickens. Yet, the page dismisses it, noting "There are theories that the 'peak oil' concept is a fraud concocted by the oil industries to increase prices amid concerns about future supplies."[1]
  4. The Wikipedia article "The Plan (Washington, D.C.)" is one of the conspiracy theories included on the official Wikipedia conspiracy list. However, the article cites few sources supporting the existence of the conspiracy to replace black residents with whites in Washington DC and no sources that refute the existence of the conspiracy.
  5. On August 16, 2010, Julian Assange said "there are frequent attempts by military apologists and others to manipulate our Wikipedia pages" (referring to the Wikileaks and Juina Assange Wikipedia articles.)[2]
  6. Wikipedia has once again deleted all content on the North American Union [4]. The old pages are inaccessible, and re-creation is blocked.
  7. Wikipedia's last sentence on Human Life International claimed that a killer "confessed that pamphets (sic) from the group led" him to kill. This is a complete lie designed to smear a conservative group. But this was approved by Wikipedia and remained for over a month.[3]

References

  1. List of conspiracy theories#Peak oil (July 28, 2012). Retrieved on July 28, 2012.
  2. http://www.dn.se/nyheter/chattar/wikileaks-grundare-julian-assange-chattade-1.1154564
  3. [1] Only in response to Conservapedia's criticism was the smear removed.
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