Extraterritorial rights

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Extraterritorial rights are rights of foreigners outside of ("extra-") their own country. These rights are negotiated by diplomats from more powerful countries. For example, Americans and Europeans in the late 19th and early 20th century enjoyed extraterritorial rights in China. They could not be tried in Chinese courts; their embassies tried and punished any crimes they committed.

See also

Bibliography

  • Crawford M. Bishop, "American Extraterritorial Jurisdiction in China," American Journal of International Law, Vol. 20, No. 2 (Apr., 1926), pp. 281-299 in JSTOR
  • "Extraterritoriality and the United States Court for China," American Journal of International Law, Vol. 1, No. 2 (Apr., 1907), pp. 469-480 in JSTOR
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