Homosexual Couples and Domestic Violence

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A study by the Canadian government states that "violence was twice as common among homosexual couples compared with heterosexual couples".[1]

In regards to homosexual couples and domestic violence, studies indicate that as a whole homosexual couples have higher rates of promiscuity than heterosexual couples. In addition, studies report that homosexual couples have significantly higher incidences of violent behavior which will be covered shortly. These studies are not surprising at all given what pathologists have stated regarding the commonness and brutality of homosexual murders.

Regarding studies regarding homosexual couples and violence, a recent study by the Canadian government regarding homosexual couples states that "violence was twice as common among homosexual couples compared with heterosexual couples".[2] According the American College of Pediatricians who cite several studies violence among homosexual couples is two to three times more common than among married heterosexual couples.[3] In addition, the American College of Pediatricians states the following: "Homosexual partnerships are significantly more prone to dissolution than heterosexual marriages with the average homosexual relationship lasting only two to three years."[3]

In June of 2004, the journal Nursing Clinics of North America reported the following regarding homosexual couples:

Domestic abuse is under-reported in the gay community...

Male-on-male same-sex domestic violence also has been reported in couples where one or both persons are HIV-positive. Intimate partner abuse and violence include humiliation, threatening to disclose HIV status, withholding HIV therapy, and harming family members or pets.[4]

In 2000, the New York Times in an article entitled Silence Ending About Abuse in Gay Relationships cites some information which may indicate that domestic abuse may be under-reported in the homosexual community.[5] The New York Times article states the following:

But the issue of gay domestic abuse has been shrouded by silence until recently...

For years, gay people have tried to keep quiet about the problem, said Dave Shannon, coordinator of the violence recovery program at Fenway Community Health, a gay and lesbian clinic in Boston.

Mr. Shannon said: People feel, 'Why should we air our dirty laundry? People feel so negatively about us already, the last thing we should do is contribute to negative stereotypes of us.' [5]

Contents

Studies

  • The Journal of the Family Research Institute using data from the U.S. Justice Department's Bureau of Justice Statistics and the Center for Disease Control concluded that "married men who are not separated are at least 25 times less apt to be domestically attacked than a homosexual male in an 'on-going relationship.' Even if we include all married and separated husbands, the risk of domestic violence in a male-male homosexual relationship is still at least 18 times greater."[6]
  • Another study indicated that 83% of homosexuals report they have been emotionally abused by homosexual partners. [7]
  • The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Domestic Abuse Fact Sheet states that "11% of women in homosexual relationships and 23% of men in homosexual relationships report being raped, physically assaulted, and/or stalked by an intimate partner".[8]
  • A study published in The Journal of Family Violence reported among its participants that "Emotional abuse was reported by 83%" of its participants.[7]
  • A study in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence examined conflict and violence in lesbian relationships. The researchers found that 90 percent of the lesbians surveyed had been recipients of one or more acts of verbal aggression from their intimate partners during the year prior to this study, with 31 percent reporting one or more incidents of physical abuse. [9]
  • A 1985 study of 1109 lesbians by Gwat-Yong Lie and Sabrina Gentlewarrier reported that slightly more than half of the respondents indicated that they had been abused by a female partner.[10]
  • Coleman, in a 1990 study of 90 lesbians reported that 46.6% had experienced repeated acts of violence.[11]
  • A study of 113 lesbians reported (1994) that 41% said they had been abused in one or more relationships.[12]
  • In their book, Men Who Beat the Men Who Love Them: Battered Gay Men and Domestic Violence (1991), Island and Letellier postulate that "the incidence of domestic violence among gay men is nearly double that in the heterosexual population."[13]
  • The Journal of Social Service Research reported in 1991 that survey of 1,099 lesbians showed that slightly more than 50 percent of the lesbians reported that they had been abused by a female lover/partner, "the most frequently indicated forms of abuse were verbal/emotional/psychological abuse and combined physical-psychological abuse." [14]
  • A study of lesbian couples reported (2000) in the Handbook of Family Development and Intervention "indicates that 54 percent had experienced 10 or more abusive incidents, 74 percent had experienced six or more incidents, 60 percent reported a pattern to the abuse, and 71 percent said it grew worse over time."[15]

See Also

References

  1. http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-570-x/85-570-x2006001-eng.pdf
  2. 2004 General Social Survey, Statistics Canada, Canada's National Statistical Agency, July 7, 2005
  3. 3.0 3.1 http://www.acpeds.org/?CONTEXT=art&cat=22&art=50
  4. Nursing Clinics of North America North Am. 2004 Jun;39(2):403
  5. 5.0 5.1 New York Times, Silence Ending About Abuse in Gay Relationships by By JOHN LELAND, November 6, 2000
  6. Gay Domestic Violence Finally Measured, Journal of the Family Research Institute, Vol. 16 No. 8, Dec 2001
  7. 7.0 7.1 A Descriptive Analysis of Same-Sex Relationship Violence for a Diverse Sample, The Journal of Family Violence, Publisher Springer Netherlands, Volume 15, Number 3, September, 2000, Pages 281-293. ISSN 0885-7482
  8. National Center for PTSD Fact Sheet
  9. Lettie L. Lockhart et al., "Letting out the Secret:Violence in Lesbian Relationships," pp. 469-492 Journal of Interpersonal Violence 9 (1994)
  10. Gwat-Yong Lie & S. Gentlewarrier. Intimate Violence in Lesbian Relationships: Discussion of Survey Findings and Practice Implications, p. 46 (1991) 15 Journal of Social Service Research The Haworth Press
  11. Coleman, V. The Relationship Between Personality and the Perpetration of Violence, Internet, Abstracted from Violence and Victims, Vol. 9, No. 2, 1994
  12. Ristock, J., And Justice for All?...The Social Context of Legal Responses to Abuse in Lesbian Relationships, (1994) 7 Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 420
  13. D. Island and P. Letellier, Men Who Beat the Men Who Love Them: Battered Gay Men and Domestic Violence, (New York: Haworth Press, 1991)
  14. Gwat Yong Lie and Sabrina Gentlewarrier, Intimate Violence in Lesbian Relationships: Discussion of Survey Findings and Practice Implications, p. 46, Journal of Social Service Research 15 (1991)
  15. William C. Nichols, et al, editors, Handbook of Family Development and Intervention, p. 393 (New York:John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2000)

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