Irreligion and smoking

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Paris street photo of a man smoking.

In 2015, according to survey data, 29% of France's population identified as atheists and 63% identified as non-religious.[1]

Tourists visiting France often cite smoking as the first culture shock they experience.[2] A survey by travel website Tripadvisor reported that users found that France was by far the "smokiest" country in the world.[3]

During the French Revolution, smoke filled Paris cafés turned into centers of lively political discussion and activity, often led by members of the Revolutionary clubs.[4][5] See also: French Revolution and atheism

Smoking is a causal factor for various cancers such as lung cancer and cancers of the esophagus, larynx, mouth, throat, kidney, bladder, liver, pancreas, stomach, cervix, colon, and rectum, as well as acute myeloid leukemia.[6][7][8] See also: Atheism and cancer

The abstract of the 2012 International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine journal article entitled Religion and smoking: a review of recent literature indicates:

Tobacco smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke are a major threat to human health worldwide. The effort to prevent tobacco use should be regarded as an important public health strategy. Given the significance of religion and spirituality in the daily life of more than 90% of the world's population, the relationship of religion and smoking should be seen as a critical research area. Religions are many and varied, but most value human well-being highly and so do not approve of tobacco use, even though they do not prohibit it entirely. In recent years, researchers have shown more interest in the subject of religion and health, including drug and tobacco use. Differences of focus and methodology notwithstanding, most studies have ascertained a deterrent role for religion as regards tobacco use, and several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the negative relationship between religion or spirituality and smoking.[9]

The 2017 journal article Smoking and Religion: Untangling Associations Using English Survey Data published in the Journal of Religion and Health indicates:

Highest levels of smoking characterise people not professing any religion... An association between smoking and the absence of a religious affiliation is sustained. An understanding of the association between smoking and religion is essential to the development of tobacco control programmes.[10]

According to Science Daily:

Young Swiss men who say that they believe in God are less likely to smoke cigarettes or pot or take ecstasy pills than Swiss men of the same age group who describe themselves as atheists. Belief is a protective factor against addictive behaviour. This is the conclusion reached by a study funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation.[11]

In 2015, according to survey data, 29% of France's population identified as atheists and 63% identified as non-religious.[1] Tourists visiting France often cite smoking as the first culture shock they experience.[12] A survey by travel website Tripadvisor reported that users found that France was by far the "smokiest" country in the world.[13]

Association between irreligion and waterpipe tobacco smoking

See also

External links

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 La carte de l’athéisme dans le monde : la France numéro 4, L'Obs, 2015
  2. The French and smoking: Is France really 'Europe's chimney'
  3. The French and smoking: Is France really 'Europe's chimney'
  4. Fierro, Alfred (1996). Histoire et dictionnaire de Paris. Robert Laffont. p. 743. ISBN 2-221-07862-4.
  5. French revolution in cafe society
  6. Smoking cessation fact sheet, National Cancer Institute
  7. [https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/diseases/cancer.html CDCTips From Former Smokers ®Diseases/Conditions Featured in the Campaign Smoking and Cancer], Centers For Disease Control and Prevention
  8. How smoking causes cancer, Cancer Research, UK
  9. [Religion and smoking: a review of recent literature.] by Garrusi B1, Nakhaee N., International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine , 2012;43(3):279-92.
  10. *Smoking and Religion: Untangling Associations Using English Survey Data, J Relig Health. 2017
  11. Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung [Swiss National Science Foundation] (October 3, 2013). "Believers consume fewer drugs than atheists". Science Daily website/Science News. Retrieved on May 23, 2015.
  12. The French and smoking: Is France really 'Europe's chimney'
  13. The French and smoking: Is France really 'Europe's chimney'