Irreligion in New Zealand

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In 2008, the International Social Survey Programme was conducted in New Zealand by Massey University.[1]

The results of this survey indicated that 72% of the population believed in the existence of God or a higher power, 15% are agnostic, and 13% are atheist (the survey had a 3% margin of error).[2]

Irreligion, the growth of the alt-right movement within New Zealand and potential upcoming divisions within New Zealand organized atheism

See also: Atheism and the alt-right and Western atheism, schisms and political polarization

Historically, atheists have skewed to the left politically (see: Atheism and politics).

A very sizable portion of the alt-right movement is made up of atheists. agnostics, and the non-religious (See: Atheism and the alt-right). According to the New Zealand Herald, the alt-right movement is growing in New Zealand.[3]

Western atheists have a reputation for being contentious (see: Atheism and social disharmony). In Western atheism, there have been divisions among atheists related to political polarization which have caused significant infighting (see: Western atheism, schisms and political polarization and Atheist factions). As a result organized atheism saw a marked decline (see: Decline of the atheist movement).

Both the United States and Britain showed a rise in the religious and/or belief in God recently according to survey data after a period of great contention within the atheist movement (see: American atheism and British atheism).

21st century New Zealand irreligion and religious immigrants to New Zealand

Due to the sub-replacement levels of births for the irreligious/nonreligious, countries with significant irreligious/nonreligious population often have higher levels of immigration than otherwise might be the case and many of the immigrants are religious (see: Atheism and fertility rates and Desecularization).

China is the largest source of immigrants to New Zealand and China is currently experiencing an explosive growth of evangelical Christianity (see: Growth of Christianity in China).[4] India is the second largest source of immigrants to New Zealand and India is a very religious country.[5]

Large-scale Muslim immigration to New Zealand started in the 1970s with the arrival of Fiji Indians, which was followed in the 1990s by refugees from various war-torn countries. The number of Muslims in New Zealand according to the 2013 census is 46,149, up 28% from 36,072 in the 2006 census.[6]

Growth of evangelical Christianity in New Zealand

In countries that are irreligious than most countries, it is common for evangelical Christianity to be experiencing growth and sometimes rapid/explosive growth (see: Growth of evangelical Christianity in irreligious regions).

In New Zealand, evangelical Christianity has grown from approximately 13,800 followers in 2006 to 15,400 in 2013."[7]

See also

References

  1. "Religion In New Zealand: International Social Survey Programme" (PDF). Massey University.
  2. "Religion In New Zealand: International Social Survey Programme" (PDF). Massey University.
  3. How NZ's growing alt-right movement plans to influence the election, New Zealand Herald, 2017
  4. Chinese largest source of New Zealand's migrants: statistics
  5. Chinese largest source of New Zealand's migrants: statistics
  6. [http://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/life/73973867/kiwi-converts-among-new-zealands-muslim-community Kiwi converts among New Zealand's Muslim community". stuff.co.nz.
  7. Evangelical Christianity and New Zealand