James K. Hoffmeier

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James K. Hoffmeier[1] (born February 13, 1951, Egypt) is a leading historian, archaeologist and Old Testament scholar. James Hoffmeier was born in Egypt, and lived there until the age of sixteen, where he often returns for visits for research, excavations, and teaching in ministries. Hoffmeier fleed Egypt in 1967, at the age of 16 because of the Six Day War, where he had to live in camps for several months during the conflict.[2]

Career

James Hoffmeier[3] first earned a BA from Wheaton College in Near Eastern Studies and Archaeology, and then received an MA from the University of Toronto in Egyptian Archaeology in 1975. In the years 1975 and 1977, he worked in association with the Akhenaten Temple Project in Luxor, and then finished his PhD from the University of Toronto focusing on Egyptian Religion. He later served as Professor of Archaeology and Old Testament at Wheaton College and was also the chair of Wheaton’s Department of Biblical, Theological, Religious and Archaeological Studies. In 1999, James Hoffmeier became Professor of Old Testament and Ancient Near Eastern History and Archaeology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, where he currently professes. Hoffmeier also lead excavations at the ancient site of Tell el-Borg in the Sinai from 1998-2008.

Publications

James Hoffmeir's experiences in Egypt inspired him to write a book on immigration and its relation to the biblical text,[4] which has received many endorsements.[5] Hoffmeier is a very influential scholar, and much of his main research has been in contribution to the authenticity of the exodus narratives. Oxford University has published two of Hoffmeier's major volumes on the authenticity of the exodus and wilderness traditions, titled Israel in Egypt: The evidence for the authenticity of the Exodus tradition[6] and Ancient Israel in Sinai: The Evidence for the Authenticity of the Wilderness Tradition.[7] Hoffmeier has also presented papers at two major conferences on the exodus in recent years, the first in 2013 which was based in California,[8] as well as a second major conference in 2014 based in Texas,[9] in which he was also an editor of the final publication. Some of Hoffmeier's important academic works include the following works;

  • Akhenaten and the Origins of Monotheism
  • Israel in Egypt: The evidence for the authenticity of the Exodus tradition
  • Ancient Israel in Sinai: The Evidence for the Authenticity of the Wilderness Tradition
  • The future of biblical archaeology: reassessing methodologies and assumptions
  • Some thoughts on Genesis 1 & 2 and Egyptian cosmology
  • Faith, tradition, and history: Old Testament historiography in its Near Eastern context

References

  1. James K. Hoffmeier, PhD
  2. WHAT DOES THE BIBLE TEACH ON IMMIGRATION? AN INTERVIEW WITH JAMES HOFFMEIER
  3. Egyptian Idea of Canon in Literature and Some Possible Implications for Hebrew Scribal Traditions and the Writing of the Torah Biographical Sketch
  4. See Hoffmeier's book: Hoffmeier, James K. The immigration crisis: immigrants, aliens, and the Bible. Crossway, 2009.
  5. About The Immigration Crisis
  6. Hoffmeier, James K. Israel in Egypt: The evidence for the authenticity of the Exodus tradition. Oxford University Press, 1999.
  7. Hoffmeier, James K. Ancient Israel in Sinai: The Evidence for the Authenticity of the Wilderness Tradition. Oxford University Press, 2005.
  8. Hoffmeier, James K. "Egyptologists and the Israelite Exodus from Egypt." Israel's Exodus in Transdisciplinary Perspective. Springer International Publishing, 2015. 197-208.
  9. Edited by James K. Hoffmeier, Alan R. Millard, and Gary A. Rendsburg. "Did I Not Bring Israel Out of Egypt?" Eisenbrauns, 2016: 3-35.