Jobsgate

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Jobsgate refers to the scandal in the Obama Administration where someone in the White House allegedly offered Congressman Joe Sestak a federal job in exchange for his withdrawal from the primary against incumbent U.S. Senator Arlen Specter.[1][2] On February 18, 2010, Philadelphia TV anchor Larry Kane reported that he had asked Democratic Congressman Joe Sestak, who was challenging incumbent Senator Arlen Specter, whether it was true that the Obama administration had offered Sestak a job if he would withdraw from his primary challenge to Specter. Sestak answered "yes," specifically saying the offer came from someone in the White House and that he, Sestak, turned down the offer.[3] Under American law, it is a federal crime to offer someone a federal position in exchange for favors.[4][5] If the allegations were proven true, it could be violation of the U.S. Criminal Code, Title 18.[6][7][8]

Joe Sestak's allegation that the White House offered him a job to drop out of the Pennsylvania Senate primary race against Arlen Specter is a crime that could lead to the impeachment of President Obama.[9][10] The press secretary, Robert Gibbs, shut down questions about Joe Sestak's claim that the Obama administration offered him a job in exchange for dropping out of the Senate Democratic primary race against Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter. Sestak, who did not take the alleged offer, went on to win that race but was still not willing to elaborate on his allegation in media interviews.[11][12] After the GOP secured the House in the 2010 Midterm elections, Rep. Issa said he will not pursue Jobsgate so as to not look like a partisan witch hunt by the subpoena of Bill Clinton.[Citation Needed] He will vigorously focus on other crimes committed by the Obama administration.

Contents

Joe Sestak's Job Offer

Joe Sestak alleges the Obama administration offered the second-term congressman a "high-ranking" job if he would abandon his primary challenge against Senator Arlen Specter. Sestak adamantly refused to name who it was that made the offer; both the accuser and the accused refuse to talk about the charges amid the growing Washington scandal.[11]

The American Spectator reported on the Jobsgate scandal, and how Sestak may be committing "misprision of a felony" simply by not reporting a federal crime to the proper authorities.

Jobsgate, as we call it here, refers to the emphatic charge of Congressman Joe Sestak, the Pennsylvania Democrat challenging Senator Arlen Specter for renomination, that someone (unnamed) in the Obama White House offered him a job if he would withdraw his candidacy. [...] Senator Arlen Specter, on Friday, said that making this offer, as Sestak claims was done, is a federal crime. And that Sestak may be committing "misprision of a felony" simply by not reporting a federal crime to the proper authorities.[4]
After the GOP secured the House in the 2010 Midterm elections, Rep. Issa has said he will not pursue Jobsgate so as to not look like a partisan witch hunt by the subpoena of Bill Clinton.[Citation Needed] He will vigorously focus on other crimes committed by the Obama administration.

Cover up

Sestak admitted he had been offered a job by the Obama administration if he were to withdrawal from the primary against incumbent U.S. Senator Arlen Specter. Sestak turned the alleged job down, but has declined to reveal who in the White House made the apparent offer. Reporters first started pressing White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs on February 23 and had five exchanges with him by mid-March. On March 16, Gibbs finally provided the White House Press Corp with somewhat of an answer.

I'm told that whatever conversations have been had are not problematic. I think Congressman Sestak has discussed that this is -- whatever happened is in the past, and he's focused on his primary election.[8]

Andrew Romanoff's Job Offer

The Denver Post alleged that Obama White House Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Messina offered a high ranking job with foreign aid agency USAID to ex-Colorado House Speaker Andrew Romanoff in exchange for dropping plans to challenge incumbent U.S. Senator Michael Bennet. [13] Romanoff turned down the overture and the White House endorsed Bennet. The White House would say that no job was ever offered to Romanoff and Romanoff declined to discuss any such communication with the White House.

According to Politico [14]

the White House acknowledged that it made overtures to Colorado U.S. Senate candidate Andrew Romanoff about a possible administration job as it was trying to steer him away from a primary challenge against Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet.

In a Sept. 11, 2009 email, Romanoff listed three jobs that were made available; two of them were with United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and the other was the position of director of the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.

Procedural

Democrats have made a great effort to conceal and bury the Jobsgate story. Republican Congressman Darrell Issa is pursuing answers and legal guidance on the matters however, nothing is expected to prevail until after the 2010 election cycle. From this point, the story may be a defining moment in the Obama presidency. Further more, Andrew Romanoff and Joe Sestak have played the "good guys" when in fact they are intellectually dishonest. They don't want to deal with being the subject of Democrat complicit in Democrat law breaking. They choose to bury the story as well.

References

  1. Jeffrey Lord. Specter Opens Door on White House Felonies, The American Spectator, March 16, 2010.
  2. Tim Shoemaker. Jobsgate: Obama's Watergate?, Campaign For Liberty, March 18, 2010.
  3. http://www.larrykane.com/2010/02/18/sestak-surprises-me-with-a-bombshell-statement/
  4. 4.0 4.1 Jeffrey Lord. Gibbs' Jobsgate Stonewall: Day 23, The American Spectator, March 18, 2010.
  5. Watergate to Jobsgate, VOX, March 17, 2010.
  6. Title 18, Chapter 29, § 595. Interference by administrative employees of Federal, State, or Territorial Governments, law.cornell.edu, U.S. Code.
  7. Title 18, Chapter 29, § 600. Promise of employment or other benefit for political activity, law.cornell.edu, U.S. Code.
  8. 8.0 8.1 Kimberly Schwandt. White House Press Corp vs. Gibbs on Sestak, Fox News, March 19, 2010.
  9. Congressman: White House Job Offer to Sestak May Be an 'Impeachable' Offense, FOXNews.com, May 25, 2010.
  10. Rove on Sestak-White House 'Job Offer': Somebody Broke the Law, Fox News, May 25, 2010.
  11. 11.0 11.1 James Rosen. Anatomy of a Scandal: The Curious Case of Joe Sestak's Job Offer, FOXNews.com, Retrieved March 20, 2010.
  12. Gibbs Cracks Whip as Administration Faces New Criticism, FOXNews.com, May 26, 2010.
  13. D.C. job alleged as attempt to deter Romanoff, Denver Post, September 27, 2009
  14. http://www.judicialwatch.org/weeklyupdate/2010/22-obama-white-house-bribery-part-ii Obama White House Bribery, Part II, judicialwatch.org, June 4, 2010
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