John Maynard Keynes and pederasty

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John Maynard Keynes was the founder of Keynesian economics and a pedophile.[1][2][3] Lytton Strachey, his male bed partner, wrote that Keynes was “A liberal and a sodomite, An atheist and a statistician.” [4] Keynes and his friends made numerous trips to the resorts surrounding the Mediterranean. At the resorts, little boys were sold by their families to bordellos which catered to homosexuals. [5]

In 2008, The Atlantic reported:

Keynes obsessively counted and tabulated almost everything; it was a life-long habit. As a child, he counted the number of front steps of every house on his street. Later he kept a running record (not surprisingly) of his expenses and his golf scores. He also counted and tabulated his sex life.

The first diary is easy: Keynes lists his sexual partners, either by their initials (GLS for Lytton Strachey, DG for Duncan Grant) or their nicknames ("Tressider," for J. T. Sheppard, the King's College Provost). When he apparently had a quick, anonymous hook-up, he listed that sex partner generically: "16-year-old under Etna" and "Lift boy of Vauxhall" in 1911, for instance, and "Jew boy," in 1912.[6]

During his early 20s he kept an extensive record of his sexual activities and throughout the early 1900s he had numerous homosexual encounters. The records he kept are available from the modern archives at King's College, Cambridge.[7]

Barack Obama advocates the use of Keynesian economic concepts despite the fact that the pedophile John Maynard Keynes was incompetent and a fraud.[8]

Zygmund Dobbs wrote in his work Keynes at Harvard:

In 1967 the world was startled by the publication of the letters between Lytton Strachey and Maynard Keynes. Undisputed evidence in their private correspondence shows that Keynes was a life-long sexual deviate. What was more shocking was that these practices extended to a large group. Homosexuality, sado-masochism, lesbianism, and the deliberate policy of corrupting the young was the established practice of this large and influential group which eventually set the political and cultural tone for the British Empire.

Keynes’ sexual partner, Lytton Strachey, indicated that their sexual attitudes could be infiltrated, “subtly, through literature, into the bloodstream of the people, and in such a way that they accepted it all quite naturally, if need be, without at first realizing what it was to which they were agreeing.” He further explained, privately, that, “he sought to write in a way that would contribute to an eventual change in our ethical and sexual mores—a change that couldn’t ‘be done in a minute,’ but would unobtrusively permeate the more flexible minds of young people.” This is a classic expression of the Fabian socialist method of seducing the mind. This was written in 1929 when it was already in practice for over forty years. It is no wonder we are reaping the whirlwind of student disorders where drug addiction and homosexuality rule the day.[9]

Keynes was a bisexual who married Lydia Lopokova, a famous Russian ballerina; they were married for 21 years. [10] In his work The Cambridge Apostles, 1820-1914: Liberalism, Imagination, and Friendship in British Intellectual and Professional Life, William C. Lubenow expresses the opinion that Keynes was an agnostic.[11]

See also

External links

References

  1. http://www.keynesatharvard.org/book/KeynesatHarvard-ch09.html
  2. http://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2008/01/keyness-jew-boy-quickie/220620/
  3. http://centurean2.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/fabian-john-maynard-keynes-the-stealthy-enemy-of-human-freedom/
  4. KEYNES AT HARVARD.
  5. KEYNES AT HARVARD.
  6. http://www.theatlantic.com/daily-dish/archive/2008/01/keyness-jew-boy-quickie/220620/
  7. http://moreintelligentlife.com/node/824
  8. http://www.keynesatharvard.org/book/KeynesatHarvard-ch09.html
  9. Bloomsbury Ballerina: Lydia Lopokova, Imperial Dancer and Mrs John Maynard Keynes.
  10. The Cambridge Apostles, 1820-1914: Liberalism, Imagination, and Friendship in British Intellectual and Professional Life, 1998, Cambridge University Press, page 402
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