Kinkazu Saionji

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Kinkazu Saionji (d. 1993) was the grandson of Kimmochi Saionji a very influential figure in modern Japan.[1] Kinkazu Saionji was the secretary of the Japanese Council of the Institute of Pacific Relations (IPR) and became a consultant of the Japanese Foreign Minister. Saionji enjoyed free access to the highest social and official circles in Japan and enjoyed a special intimacy with the Prime Minister, Prince Fumimaro Konoe. Saionji introduced Hozumi Ozaki into these circles, and both men—Ozaki and Saionji—became members of what was known as Konoe's "breakfast group," a group of high level trusted advisers. Both of these men—Ozaki and Saionji—were KGB agents and members of the famous Sorge spy ring. Closely associated with them was Tomohiko Ushiba,[2] Saionji's predecessor as secretary of the Japanese IPR.

A note from Dr. Edward C. Carter to Frederick Vanderbilt Field reads,

"Dear Fred: As you know, we began early last autumn trying to get a man of the rank of Ushiba, Matsukata and Saionji to join the International Secretariat [of the IPR]."[3]

Saionji was convicted and sentenced to three years, but because of his powerful family connections got a suspended sentence. Richard Sorge, head of the spy ring, and Ozaki were executed.[4] Saionji emigrated in the 1950s to the Peoples Republic of China.[5]

References

  1. New York Times Obituary, April 23, 1993.
  2. Statement Handed by the Ambassador in Japan (Grew) to Mr. Tomohiko Ushiba, Private Secretary of the Japanese Prime Minister (Prince Konoye) [64, 6 July 1941, U.S. Department of State, Publication 1983, Peace and War: United States Foreign Policy, 1931-1941 (Washington, D.C.: U.S., Government Printing Office, 1943), pp. 685.
  3. United States Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security Hearings, August 9, 1951.
  4. While You Slept : Our Tragedy in Asia and Who Made It, John T. Flynn, New York : The Devin - Adair Company, 1951, pgs. 139 - 141pdf.
  5. Klehr & Radosh (1996); Haynes & Klehr (1999: 375); Johnson (1964: 105, 111-13, 231 n*).
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