Law review

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A law review, like a law journal, is an academic publication of current and new theories in the law, and is largely written by professors and reviewed by law students. Although read widely within the legal professional world, since law journals bear mostly on theory, they have little influence on areas outside appellate practice. Occasionally, Supreme Court opinions will cite to law review articles, but since only high courts can guide the direct of law, lower appellate and trial courts rarely do the same.

Most law schools will have several law journals, but only one law review. A "review" is more generalist, and at a given law school, membership on the law review is commensurate with a high degree of academic success at the same.[1] Other law journals target niche subjects, and are edited by other highly successful students.[2]

References

  1. http://www.avemarialaw.edu/index.cfm?event=academics.LawReview
  2. For Harvard's other journals, see http://www.law.harvard.edu/students/orgs/publications.php.
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