Leukocidin

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Leukocidin (also spelled Leucocidin) is a bacterial cytoxic protein consisting of two components which act in accord to induce cytotoxic changes in leukocytes, as well as other cells, such as connective tissue cells and the cells of the sympathetic nervous system.[1][2] Leukocidin is produced specifically by Pseudomonos aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.[1] The cytotoxin is released by the bacteria through an accumulation of intracellular calcium.[1]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Maurice Bartlett Hallett (31 January 1989). The Neutrophil: Cellular Biochemistry and Physiology. CRC Press. ISBN 0849348080. Retrieved on 10 June 2012. “Leukocodicin is a cytoxic protein produced by bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonos aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. It consists of two components which act syngergistically to induce cytotoxic changes in neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes, but not erythrocytes or platelets. The mode of leukocidin is unknown, but it has been reported that it leads to an accumulation of Ca2+ which is accompanied by secretion.” 
  2. (1920) The Journal of Infectious Diseases: Volume 27. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 0849348080. Retrieved on 10 June 2012. “According to Deny and Van de Velde,' staphylococcus leukocidin is a metabolic product that acts not only on leukocytes, but on other cells, such as connective tissue cells and the cells of the sympathetic nervous system.” 

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