Liberal Smear Machine

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Liberal Smear Machine is an informal term for the liberal organized tactic of attempting to discredit conservative ideology through the methods of media bias, professor bias, and vandalism & censorship of conservative ideas on wikis and blogs.

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2008 Presidential elections

Main article: 2008 Presidential election

Th JournoList functioned as a private email list of liberal journalists, educators, and pundits.[1] Members of the list planned inserting the Democratic race card in stories attacking critics who were hesitant or with reservations in supporting Barack Hussein Obama as racist.

There were also coordinated attacks on Sarah Palin and her family.[2] Also, there were postings to the listerv talking gleefully about how one of the listserv members would love to see the death of Rush Limbaugh.[3][4]

Early leftist smear machines

In 1949 the California State Senate published a report stating,

Through their newspapers, magazines, books, symposiums, pamphlets, handbills and analytical publications, the Communists train and educate their converts in Marxism-Leninism-Stalinism; and, at the same time, they spread their propaganda to confuse, disrupt and divide.... Equally important ... is the fundamental requirement for machinery and methods for attack and smear. Anyone who opposes or exposes the Communist conspiracy must be destroyed.

A continuous program of character assassination is conducted by the Communist publication-system designed to discredit anyone who attacks or exposes Communism. Public officials and law enforcement agencies are to be constantly smeared and discredited in the minds of members of mass organizations. (emphasis in original)...they are able to organize a propaganda campaign on a few hours notice. They will produce publications, press releases, plant Red propaganda in all media, and circulate resolutions, protests, denunciations and confusing reports on any subject on short notice.[5]

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