Liberal apathy

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Liberal apathy refers to the pervasive apathy by liberals towards other people and many important aspects of society in general. Liberal apathy often stems from the elitist attitudes that many liberals hold towards other individuals.

Problems Identifying Liberal Apathy

One major problem in identifying liberal apathy is that although many liberals engage in actions or believe in ideas that seem to exemplify this apathy (see examples below) they may, in reality, have negative or manipulative intent. Apathy is simply the most positive explanation, and its presence may reflect how liberals are significantly out of step with most Americans outside their clique.

Examples of Liberal Apathy

  • President Barack Hussein Obama's delay to focus any significant effort to contain and clean up the British Petroleum oil spill, despite the millions of dollars in income that are lost every day by the people living and working along the Gulf Coast.[1]
  • Liberals disregard the truth and logic inherent in the Bible, seemingly as if they don't care about their personal and/or spiritual well-being. Apathy is one possible explanation for someone completely ignoring the concept of Hell. Life on Earth is temporary, but Hell is forever.
  • Liberals don't seem to care about anti-Semitic comments common in everyday occurrence[2] (like Palestinian terrorist attacks against Israel, a close American ally) but relish in the use of such a slur when it suits their purposes.[3] This apathy may comprise part of the subconscious reasoning behind the liberal double standard
  • Liberal ideas like the welfare state cultivate a culture of lazy citizens apathetic towards hard work, perseverance, and a better standard of living for their families.[4]
  • Many liberal voters, especially those in the 2008 presidential election, were young people in the 18-29 age range,[5][6] a demographic long known for its apathetic attitude toward work, personal health, and American society in general. [7]

References

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