Line-item veto

From Conservapedia

Jump to: navigation, search

The line-item veto is the power of the top executive in government, either the president or a state governor, to sign a budget into law while striking out (lining out) certain expense items that the executive disfavors. This is favored by conservatives to reduce overall spending, but the U.S. Supreme Court held it to be unconstitutional at the federal level. Many state governors have this power.

Part of the controversy around the line item veto is in the separation of powers in government. The line item veto can be used to change the meaning of passages in a law. Vetoing a 'not' can drastically alter the meaning of a sentence. It has also been used to selectively veto letters and make new law - a power that should not be in the hands of the executive branch.

For example, the passage:

"A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

Could be vetoed

"A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed."

Which would now read:

"A late miler of a free state, shall not be infringed."

Further reading

Personal tools