Marcel Proust

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Marcel Proust (Paris, 1871 – Paris, 1922) was a French writer. He is considered one of the greatest novelists of the 20th century[Citation Needed], along with Franz Kafka and James Joyce. On top of that, he is also regarded widely as the best (and most well-known) homosexual author of the past two millennia.[Citation Needed] His mother was from an Alsatian Jewish family.

In Search of Lost Time (or Remembrance of Things Past) (À la recherche du temps perdu), an autobiographical novel in seven volumes, is his most recognized work. The most famous of Proust's essays is that on Gustave Flaubert's style.

"It seems that the taste for books grows with intelligence."

"Proust died of pneumonia on November 18, 1922. The remaining volumes of his novel, which he had finished but not completely revised, were published by his brother Robert, with the help of Jacques Rivière and Jean Paulhan, directors of La Nouvelle Revue Française. These volumes were La Prisonnière (1923), Albertine disparue (1925) and Le Temps retrouvé (1927)." [1]

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