Matthew 1-9 (Translated)

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Contents

Chapter 1

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. The ancestry of Jesus Christ, descendant of David, descendant of Abraham: "Descendant" is more accurate than "son."
2 Abraham begat Isaac; and Isaac begat Jacob; and Jacob begat Judas and his brethren; Abraham fathered Isaac; and Isaac fathered Jacob; and Jacob fathered Judah and his brothers; While begat is a somewhat unusual word, it is understood throughout the world and hard to replace without resorting to the passive.
3 And Judas begat Phares and Zara of Thamar; and Phares begat Esrom; and Esrom begat Aram; And Judah fathered Pharez and Zerah of Tamar, and Pharez fathered Hezron, and Esrom fathered Ram, Original Hebrew transliterations are given here, with links to their biographies. The Greek versions of the names appeared in the Septuagint.
4 And Aram begat Aminadab; and Aminadab begat Naasson; and Naasson begat Salmon; And Ram fathered Amminadab, and Amminadab fathered Nahson, and Naason fathered Salmon,
5 And Salmon begat Booz of Rachab; and Booz begat Obed of Ruth; and Obed begat Jesse; And Salmon fathered Boaz of Rahab, and Boaz fathered Obed of Ruth, and Obed fathered Jesse,
6 And Jesse begat David the king; and David the king begat Solomon of her that had been the wife of Urias; And Jesse fathered King David, and King David fathered Solomon (whose mother was the former wife of Uriah),
7 And Solomon begat Roboam; and Roboam begat Abia; and Abia begat Asa; And Solomon fathered Rehoboam, and Rehoboam fathered Abijah, and Abijah fathered Asa,
8 And Asa begat Josaphat; and Josaphat begat Joram; and Joram begat Ozias; And Asa fathered Jehoshaphat, and Jehoshaphat fathered Jehoram, and Jehoram fathered Uzziah, King Jehoram was not the father of Uzziah, but rather was his great-grandfather. Kings Joash and Amaziah are left out because they were unworthy of being remembered. Joash killed High Priest Zachariah I, and Amaziah "did right,...but not with a whole heart."
9 And Ozias begat Joatham; and Joatham begat Achaz; and Achaz begat Ezekias; And Uzziah fathered Jotham, and Jotham fathered Ahaz, and Ahaz fathered Hezekiah, The inclusion of King Ahaz is truly remarkable, considering Ahaz' less-than-honorable history.
10 And Ezekias begat Manasses; and Manasses begat Amon; and Amon begat Josias; And Hezekiah fathered Manasseh, and Manasseh fathered Amon, and Amon fathered Josiah, Hezekiah and Josiah were the two finest reformers in the entire king list of the Kingdom of Judah
11 And Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren, about the time they were carried away to Babylon: And Josiah fathered Jeconiah and his brothers, at the time of the exile in Babylon, Kings Jehoahaz II and Jehoiakim are left out, as is Jeconiah's uncle Zedekiah.
12 And after they were brought to Babylon, Jechonias begat Salathiel; and Salathiel begat Zorobabel; And after the exile in Babylon, Jeconiah fathered Salathiel, and Salathial fathered Zerubbabel, "Zorobabel" and "Zerubabel" are two equally valid pronunciations of this Hebrew name. Zerubbabel was governor of what became the Judea Province of the Persian Empire under King Darius I and his successors.
13 And Zorobabel begat Abiud; and Abiud begat Eliakim; and Eliakim begat Azor; And Zerubbabel fathered Abihud, and Abihud fathered Eliakim, and Eliakim fathered Azor,
14 And Azor begat Sadoc; and Sadoc begat Achim; and Achim begat Eliud; And Azor fathered Zadoc, and Zadoc fathered Achim, and Achim fathered Eliud,
15 And Eliud begat Eleazar; and Eleazar begat Matthan; and Matthan begat Jacob; And Eliud fathered Eleazar, and Eleazar fathered Matthan, and Matthan fathered Jacob,
16 And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ. And Jacob fathered Joseph, the husband of Mary, whose child was Jesus Christ. The preceding lineage establishes the legal claim that Jesus has to the throne of King David, consistent with a specific promise that God made to King David that a king would inherit his title and rule the world forever.
17 So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; and from David until the carrying away into Babylon are fourteen generations; and from the carrying away into Babylon unto Christ are fourteen generations. So it was fourteen generations from Abraham to King David, and fourteen generations from King David until the exile in Babylon, and fourteen generations from the exile until Jesus Christ. These are fourteen generations chosen for special memory. In fact, the generations from David to the exile number seventeen. Three of the Kings of Judah are left out because they were unworthy; they are Joash, Amaziah, and Jehoiakim.
18 Now the birth of Jesus Christ was on this wise: When as his mother Mary was espoused to Joseph, before they came together, she was found with child of the Holy Ghost. The birth of Jesus Christ happened this way: His mother, Mary, was engaged to Joseph, but before they were married, she became pregnant with the child of the Holy Spirit. In ancient Judea, an engagement was a legal obligation much stronger than a modern "engagement." The only cause sufficient to break an engagement was immoral behavior by one party or the other. In this case, Mary was found to be pregnant, and that was considered evidence of adultery by her. (Joseph did not yet know the circumstances of the pregnancy; he would find that out later.)

The Greek phrase πνευμα αγιος (Pneuma hagios) literally means "Holy Breath." However, πνευμα also means a class of being not having a body, and usually having a certain amount of power. "God's will" or perhaps "God's love" is descriptive of the function of this Entity.

19 Then Joseph her husband, being a just man, and not willing to make her a publick example, was minded to put her away privily. Her husband Joseph was a righteous man, and did not want to publicly shame her. So he decided to divorce her privately. This emphasizes that Joseph is right to object to suspected adultery, but that even in these circumstances, divorce is a last option. Furthermore, "divorce" in this context is the breaking of an engagement, and the voiding of an obligation to marry the girl. Joseph could have insisted on making a public example (δειγματίσαι) of Mary, but was righteous (δίκαιος) and did not wish to put Mary through that.
20 But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. While he thought about this, the angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying "Joseph, son of David, do not fear to take Mary as a wife, because her pregnancy is due to God's will. Joseph discovers that the cause of the pregnancy is not adultery, as he had feared. "God's will" captures the meaning well, almost as the force of logic once God decided to appear in this world.
21 And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name JESUS: for he shall save his people from their sins. And she shall bring forth a son, who you must name Jesus, for He will save his people from their sins." The name Jesus (Hebrew: ישןע, Yeshua; Greek Ιησους) literally means "God saves."
22 Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, This entire affair happened in order to fulfill the spoken word from the Lord, through the prophet (Isaiah), which states:
23 Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us. "A virgin shall be pregnant, and give birth to a son, who will be named Emmanuel," which means "God is with us." Isaiah 7:14 , originally in the Septuagint.
24 Then Joseph being raised from sleep did as the angel of the Lord had bidden him, and took unto him his wife: Therefore, when Joseph woke up, he did as the angel of the Lord had instructed him, and wed Mary.
25 And knew her not till she had brought forth her firstborn son: and he called his name JESUS. And did not consummate the marriage until she bore her son, who Joseph named Jesus.

Chapter 2

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, When Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea, during the reign of King Herod, a number of scholars came to Jerusalem from the east. "Scholars" captures the concept better in contemporary English than "wise men" or "astrologers". They were learned men, which at that time included study of astrology and dream interpretation. The Greek manuscript literally calls them "mages," but no evidence exists that any of them practiced sorcery, thaumaturgy, or any similar art. Their number is not given in any extant manuscript. They brought three categories of gifts (see below), but they were not three in number and probably were a much larger party.


While this passage is commonly taught as the revelation of Christianity to Gentiles, another interpretation is the revelation of Christ to scholars, opening the door to vast Biblical Scientific Foreknowledge.

2 Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him. They asked, "where is the child who was born as the King of the Jews? We saw his star in the eastern sky, and we came here to worship him." The star was probably the planet Jupiter, which in the year of their trip (probably 1 BC) had made its every-twelve-year apparent reversal of course and had conjoined three times with Regulus, the "King Star," also known as Alpha Leonis because it is the brightest star in the constellation Leo, meaning lion. The lion has always been a symbol of Judah, his tribe, and the kingdom that bore his name under King David (for seven years) and the successors of Solomon.
3 When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him. When King Herod heard these things, he was agitated, as was all of Jerusalem.
4 And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born. So he gathered all the leading priests and the scribes, and demanded that they tell him where Christ would be born. Herod probably summoned the members of the Sanhedrin and interrogated them.
5 And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet, And they said to him, "He will be born in Bethlehem which is in Judea, in fulfillment of the prophecy, which states:
6 And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel. "You, Bethlehem, in the land of Judah, are not the least of the provinces of Judah, for out of you shall come a King who shall rule all Israel."
7 Then Herod, when he had privily called the wise men, inquired of them diligently what time the star appeared. Then Herod spoke privately with the scholars and carefully asked them when the star would appear which would announce Christ's birth.
8 And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship him also. So he sent them to Bethlehem with the instructions, "Go, and search diligently for the baby, and when you have found him, tell me, so that I can come and worship him."
9 When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was. When they had heard the King's instructions, they departed. To their great surprise, the star which they saw in the east reversed direction, until it came to a standstill, seemingly directly over the location where the child was. Literally, a toddler. Jesus was not an infant anymore.

The Greek text, rendered "went before," is actually consistent with the retrograde motion of the planet Jupiter. All planets that are further out from the Sun than earth move apparently retrograde once every synodic year.

10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy. When they saw the star, they felt the greatest joy.
11 And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him: and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh. And when they went into the house, they saw the child with His mother Mary, and they fell down and worshiped Him. And they opened their bags and presented Him gifts of gold, incense, and oil of myrrh. Matt 2:11 specifies frankincense and myrrh. Each of the gifts given to Jesus has a special significance. Gold has always been the metal of royalty, and emphasizes Christ's Kingship. Frankincense has always found use as a natural wound healer, and myrrh has always been used as a preservative used in funeral preparations. Thus frankincense and myrrh prefigure Christ's ministry of healing (spiritual as well as physical) and His death and Resurrection.
12 And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way. God warned these men in a dream that they should not return to King Herod, so they went to their own country by an alternate route. That God gave the warning directly is an assumption. That God was instrumental in the giving of that warning is certainly a safe assumption.
13 And when they were departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying, Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him. Once they had departed, the angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream, saying, "Take the young child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and stay there until I tell you otherwise: for King Herod will be searching for the infant to kill him."
14 When he arose, he took the young child and his mother by night, and departed into Egypt: When he woke up, he took the infant and His mother that night and fled to Egypt.
15 And was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have I called my son. There they stayed until the death of Herod, so that the words of the Lord's prophet would be fulfilled, which said "Out of Egypt have I beckoned my son."
16 Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men, was exceeding wroth, and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently inquired of the wise men. Herod was very angry when he saw the scholars had deceived him. He gave orders than all infants two years old and younger in Bethlehem and the neighboring coastlines be killed, as this would assuredly kill any infant born at the time the scholars had told him.
17 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying, This is how the prophecy of Jeremy was fulfilled, which said,
18 In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not. "In Rama a weeping and mourning voice was heard, for Rachel wept for her children, and could not be comforted, because they are not alive." This verse directly quotes the Septuagint.
19 But when Herod was dead, behold, an angel of the Lord appeareth in a dream to Joseph in Egypt, When Herod died, an angel of the Lord appeared in a dream to Joseph, who was in Egypt. Herod probably died in 1 BC.
20 Saying, Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and go into the land of Israel: for they are dead which sought the young child's life. And the angel said, "Rise, and take the infant and His mother, and go to Israel, for those who sought to kill Him are dead."
21 And he arose, and took the young child and his mother, and came into the land of Israel. So he rose, and took the infant and His mother, and went to Israel.
22 But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee: When he heard that Archelaus reigned in Judea as successor to his father Herod, Joseph was afraid to go there, but on God's instructions, he entered into the region around Galilee,
23 And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene. and settled in a city called Nazareth. This fulfilled the prophecy, "He shall be called a Nazarene."

Chapter 3

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, In those times there was a man called John the Baptist, who preached in the deserts of Judea. Literally, "John the Baptizer."
2 And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. He would say, "You must repent, for the kingdom of heaven is near!" The Greek verb μετανοεω literally means "I change my mind." Repentance means a change of heart and mind, and a turning away from a prior path.
3 For this is he that was spoken of by the prophet Esaias, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight. John the Baptist was the man prophesied by Isaiah, who spoke of "the voice of a man crying out in the desert, 'Prepare the path of the Lord!'"
4 And the same John had his raiment of camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts and wild honey. John the Baptist had a shirt made of camel's hair and a leather loincloth, and he ate grasshoppers and wild honey. "Locusts" refers to a swarm of any of various grass-eating insects, most commonly the grasshopper, but also (in America) the cicada. "Wild honey" is honey taken from any hive that is not specifically maintained and entails getting stung. These descriptions of the clothing and diet of John the Baptist emphasize his character as "roughing it" and living quite literally off the land. A hairshirt is uncomfortable and the act of wearing a hairshirt, or cilice, as an act of penance persists among Catholics today. This eccentric description of John shows him in a state of literally physical discomfort, wearing poor clothing and eating poor food, as an act of penance as he wanders the desert preaching.
5 Then went out to him Jerusalem, and all Judaea, and all the region round about Jordan, And many citizens of Jerusalem, and of all the neighboring regions, went out to John the Baptist,
6 And were baptized of him in Jordan, confessing their sins. and were baptized by him in the Jordan river as they confessed their sins. "Baptism" literally means washing by total body immersion.
7 But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? When John saw how many Pharisees and Sadducees came to be baptized by him, he said to them, "You jerks! Who has warned you to flee from the divine sentence that's coming to you? The phrase Γεννηματα εχιδνων, "sons of snakes," is an insult, akin to "sons of (female dogs)" or "bastards" or simply "jerks."

The word rendered "wrath" is οργη, which refers to the attitude of a magistrate before whom a convict appears for sentencing. In this context, they are clearly attempting to flee from God's justice by baptism. John finds this richly ironic, because he knows that Pharisees and Sadducees would be united in their "citified" contempt of him, because he's a roughneck who doesn't "dress properly," and everyone in Jerusalem surely knows it.

8 Bring forth therefore fruits meet for repentance: "If you want to escape that fate, show in your lives fruits that deserve to be called fruits of repentance.
9 And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto you, that God is able of these stones to raise up children unto Abraham. "Do not think to yourself, 'We have Abraham as our patriarch, and are saved on that account." For I tell you now that God could make these stones into children of Abraham if He wanted to." God is no Respecter of persons, or of their races or national or clannish origins.
10 And now also the axe is laid unto the root of the trees: therefore every tree which bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. "Already the ax is about to fall on the roots of the trees. So every tree that does not bring forth good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire.
11 I indeed baptize you with water unto repentance: but he that cometh after me is mightier than I, whose shoes I am not worthy to bear: he shall baptize you with the Holy Ghost, and with fire: On the one hand, I baptize you with water, as you repent: but on the other hand he who will come after me is far mightier, and I don't deserve to carry his shoes. He will immerse you in God's will, and in fire.
12 Whose fan is in his hand, and he will throughly purge his floor, and gather his wheat into the garner; but he will burn up the chaff with unquenchable fire. His winnowing shovel is in his hand, and he will rid his threshing-floor of all impure elements, and gather his wheat into his barn; and he will burn the chaff with a fire that cannot be quenched. The Greek word ασβεστος, meaning "unquenchable", survives as the term asbestos, a mineral once prized as a flame-retardant.
13 Then cometh Jesus from Galilee to Jordan unto John, to be baptized of him. Now Jesus came from Galilee to Jordan, to be baptized by John.
14 But John forbad him, saying, I have need to be baptized of thee, and comest thou to me? But John begged Him to stop, saying, "No, I need to be baptized by you, not you by me."
15 And Jesus answering said unto him, Suffer it to be so now: for thus it becometh us to fulfil all righteousness. Then he suffered him. And Jesus in answer said to him, "Allow yourself to baptize me, for it is necessary and proper." So John allowed it.
16 And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and, lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him: And Jesus, once He was baptized, rose out of the water and the heavens opened for him, and the spirit of God descended like a dove upon Him.
17 And lo a voice from heaven, saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. And a voice spoke from heaven, saying, "This my beloved Son, with whom I am very pleased."

Chapter 4

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. Then God's will led Jesus into the desert to be tested by the devil. The word traditionally rendered "to tempt" means "to test," as an engineer will test a new material or assembly, often "to failure." This was Jesus' Final Examination.

The Greek word διαβουλος literally means "to throw around." The traditional rendition, "devil," is a contraction of the Greek word.

1b Then was Jesus led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. Then Jesus was lead by the Holy Spirit into the desert to be tried by the devil. The Aramaic (Syriac) Peshitta provides understanding and is important not only because if is the first translation after the Greek original but also because it captures the "aramaisms in the original

Greek and as some have pointed out, either orally or written, it provides the Aramaic sources from which the Original Greek, that is the earliest we have, might be a translation and reworking.

"Spirit" in Greek, "Holy Spirit" in Aramaic ( Ruha d Qudsha)

Important to leave as the Greek has it the passive. "Jesus was led"

2 And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred. And after having fasted for 40 days and nights, Jesus was very hungry.
2b And when he had fasted forty days and forty nights, he was afterward an hungred. And after having fasted for 40 days and nights, Jesus began to be hungry Greek and Syriac strongly imply that Jesus felt no hunger until the end of the 40 days and nights of fast.
3 And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread. And the tester (Satan) came to him and said, "If you are truly the Son of God, order that these rocks be made into food".
3b And when the tempter came to him, he said, If thou be the Son of God, command that these stones be made bread. And the Tempter came to him and said, "If you are the Son of God, command that these stones become bread". "eipe" say, literally say. Less literally but better English, "tell" these stones to become bread. Then Jesus would have been told by the devil to speak to the stones. I think that the KJV "command" is the best.
4 But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God. But Jesus said in answer, "Scripture says: The life of Man is not just about consuming food, but about consuming the message of God". Satan suggests that Jesus should be an economic Messiah. Jesus rejects this, saying that taking God's message to heart is more important even than the daily diet.
4b But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God. But Jesus answered and said, It is written, "Man does not live by bread alone, but also by every word coming from the mouth of God The solemn and sonorous Biblical "answered and said" is proliptic and should be retained. It is there to tell us that we are about to hear Holy Writ. "It is written", is literal , understandable , and Hebraic all at once.
5 Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple, Then the devil took him into the holy city, and stood him up on the pinnacle of the Temple.
5b Then the devil taketh him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple, Then the devil took Him into the Holy City, and set Him on the parapet of the Temple.
6 And saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone. And he told him, "If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down. Scripture says, does it not, 'He shall give His Messengers a responsibility concerning You, and will carry You in their hands to prevent You from so much as striking Your foot against a stone.'" The word αγγελος literally means "messenger."
6b And saith unto him, If thou be the Son of God, cast thyself down: for it is written, He shall give his angels charge concerning thee: and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot against a stone. The devil said to Him, "If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down. Yes, it is written, "Concerning you, He will command His angels and they will bear you up in their hands so that not even your foot will hit rock. "
7 Jesus said unto him, It is written again, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God. Jesus told him, "Scripture also says, 'Do not put the Lord your God to the test.'" God will provide Divine protection up to a point, but to rely on Him to bail one out of the consequences of bad judgment is bad form. In fact, Satan suggests that Jesus be a magical or wonder-working Messiah, and Jesus rejects that advice as well.
7b Jesus said unto him, It is written again, Thou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God. Jesus said to him, "Again, it is written, Do not tempt the Lord your God."
8 Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and sheweth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them; Again the devil took Him up to an extremely tall mountain, and showed him all the nation-states of the world and all their glory, The Greek word βασιλεια, a kingdom, is rendered "nation-state" here because it can stand for any nation-state having any form of government. Representative republics were not known at the time that the Evangelists and Apostles wrote, though they had been known earlier. All heads-of-state with whom these writers were familiar held titles that would translate today as "king" or "emperor." But when Satan shows Jesus all the nation-states of the world, he does not limit this vision only to those nation-states known to the Evangelists, or even only to those nation-states then existing. Rather, Satan demonstrates all nation-states, past, present, and future, as if to say that the governments of men have always been Satan's to bestow on anyone. Such is the measure of Satan's incomparable pride.
8b Again, the devil taketh him up into an exceeding high mountain, and sheweth him all the kingdoms of the world, and the glory of them; And again the the devil took Him up a very high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world with all their magnificence
9 And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me. and told him, "I will give You all these things, if You will fall down and worship me." Satan now offers Jesus the chance to be a political Messiah, One Who uses raw political power.
9b And saith unto him, All these things will I give thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me. He said to Him, "I will give You all these things, if You will prostrate yourself and worship me."
10 Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve. Then Jesus told him, "Get away from me, Satan. Scripture says, 'You shall worship the Lord your God, and serve Him alone.'"
10b Then saith Jesus unto him, Get thee hence, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve. Then Jesus said to him, "Go, Satan! For it is written, 'You shall worship the Lord your God, and Him alone shall you serve.'"
11 Then the devil leaveth him, and, behold, angels came and ministered unto him. Then the devil left Him, and suddenly messengers of God came and waited on Him. The word used is διακονεω, which means "I wait on someone like a table waiter." From this root comes the Greek word διακονος a table waiter, which survives today as the word deacon.
11b Then the devil leaveth him, and, behold, angels came and ministered unto him. Then, when the devil left Him, the angels came and served Him. the "behold" asking us to see, and we do and we see, after the devil has left, or as he is leaving, the angels, in their turn, are coming in.


12 Now when Jesus had heard that John was cast into prison, he departed into Galilee; Now when Jesus had heard that John had been arrested, he went away into Galilee;
13 And leaving Nazareth, he came and dwelt in Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast, in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim: And leaving Nazareth, he came and settled in Capernaum, which is on the seacoast, near the border between the tribal lands of Zebulun and Naphthali,
14 That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, in order that the words might be fulfilled that were spoken by Isaiah the prophet, who said,
15 The land of Zabulon, and the land of Nephthalim, by the way of the sea, beyond Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles; "The land of Zebulun, and the land of Naphthali, by the way of the sea, beyond the Jordan River, Galilee of the Gentiles; The Greek word εθνοι, "nations," is rendered "Gentiles" from the Latin gens, gentis meaning "the nation", or more literally, "the clan."
16 "The people which sat in darkness saw great light; and to them which sat in the region and shadow of death light is sprung up. "The people that sat in darkness saw a great light; and to them that sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned."
17 From that time Jesus began to preach, and to say, Repent: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. From that moment Jesus began to preach, and to say, "Change your hearts, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand." Here the Greek word βασιλεια is properly rendered "kingdom" because God is, always was, and always will be, a King in the truest sense of that word.
18 And Jesus, walking by the sea of Galilee, saw two brethren, Simon called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea: for they were fishers. Now Jesus, as He walked by the sea of Galilee, saw two brothers, Simon, called Peter, and his brother Andrew, as they were casting a net into the sea, for they were fishermen. This sea is known today as Lake Tiberias. The name Peter means "rock."
19 And he saith unto them, Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men. And he told them, "Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of people." The context -- speaking to two rugged fishermen -- makes it clear that the masculine meaning of ανθρωπων was the connotation. In modern terminology, no few would use a football analogy with a gender-neutral pronoun. ανθρωπος is a gender-neutral word, which means 'person', not 'man'. What you would like this verse to mean isn't relevant.
20 And they straightway left their nets, and followed him. And immediately they left their fishing nets behind and followed Him.
21 And going on from thence, he saw other two brethren, James the son of Zebedee, and John his brother, in a ship with Zebedee their father, mending their nets; and he called them. And going on from that place, He saw two other brothers, James son of Zebedee, and his brother John, in a boat with their father Zebedee, mending their nets; and He called them.
22 And they immediately left the ship and their father, and followed him. And immediately they left the boat and their father, and followed Him.
23 And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people. And Jesus traveled throughout the whole of Galilee, teaching in their synagogues and preaching the gospel of the Kingdom, and healing every kind of chronic illness and every kind of germ among the people.
24 And his fame went throughout all Syria: and they brought unto him all sick people that were taken with divers diseases and torments, and those which were possessed with devils, and those which were lunatick, and those that had the palsy; and he healed them. And the news of him spread throughout the whole of Syria (Province), and people brought to him the sick people having various diseases and torments, all demon-oppressed people, and mentally disturbed people, and paralyzed people, and He healed them. The Greek word σεληνιαζομαι means "I am struck by the moon." This was the popularly suspected cause of most mental disturbance in those times. Here Matthew clearly distinguishes between ordinary mental illness and oppression or possession by demons.
25 And there followed him great multitudes of people from Galilee, and from Decapolis, and from Jerusalem, and from Judaea, and from beyond Jordan. And great crowds of people followed Him from Galilee, and from Decapolis, and from Jerusalem and Judea and from the far side of the Jordan River.

Chapter 5

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him: Now when He saw the crowds, He went up into a mountain, and when he had taken His seat , His disciples came to Him. The Greek word μαθητης means a disciple.
1b And seeing the multitudes, her went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him: After seeing the masses before Him, he ascended the Mountain, then He sat down*[to be foot-noted at bottom]. Those who were learning from Him, came to Him What would have been understood by the original hearers and readers of Gospel of Matthew - Jesus was the fulfiller and then the displacer of Moses, viewing the crowd, as Moses did, Jesus ascended (dignified reminiscent of the Original Event, and when He got to the top, He SAT DOWN. That is mentioned, seemingly unimportant but actually very important. "Sitting down" was the 1st century act which meant "assumning authority". That is why there was a "seat of Moses" in the synagogue which Jesus said the Pharasees were presently occupying (that is why also the early bishops were represented as sitting with their clergy around them). His Learners - Talmidim (thus the Syriac and Hebrew behind the Greek Mathntns. Talmidim/mathntns does not really mean "pupil" which to the modern ear brings in "classroom", but rather followers or learners by seeing and hearing and doing - apprentices, if you will) came to him.
2 And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, Then he opened His mouth and taught them, saying:
2b And he opened his mouth, and taught them, saying, He began His Torah*[to be foot-noted at bottom] to them, then, and said: Jesus would have had to "open His mouth" in order for him "to say", but it was important to put it this way to thrust the reader to the sonorous solemnity of the Scriptures Va Ya'an vaYomer = He responded (when it was really not a response) and said. What they heard, so the original readers of the Gospel of Matthew would have now learned by this preface, is the new Torah from the One who was greater than Moses, having taken his place on "the mountain" ("mountain" here has an article - "the" precisely because it is specified, though unnamed, in contradistinction to the Mt. Sinai of Moses). The Gospel of Luke has the "sermon" on the plain while Matthew has it on the mountain. Both are correct as it is a plain going on up to the top of a mount on the north shore of the Lake. But Matthew chooses to call it "mountain" precisely because he is presenting the greater than Moses. The hearers and readers of the Gospel of Matthew would not be surprised then to hear later on in the "Sermon on the Mount" (better it be called " The Torah of the Messiah" or the "Law of the Kingdom"), " You have heard it said...but I say to you..." They would understand that the displacer and surpasser of Moses was getting the Torah directly from the Father, and no more would they have need of the line of rabbis and teachers to go back to the time of Moses. Somehow what the original readers and hearers of the Gospel would have understood must come through in the modern language. How that can be done is both an art and a miracle.
3 Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven. The Greek word μακαριος, "blessed," comes from μη (not) and the root καρ- which connotes being cut off. Thus when Jesus says that people are blessed, He means that they will not be cut off from God.

The Greek word ουρανος, literally "sky", is always rendered in the plural. (In the Old Testament it was rendered in the Hebrew dual number.)

3b Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. So truly blessed are those that are not full of the themselves. The Kingdom of heaven is theirs. Here and in the rest of the "beatitudes", blessed is a good translation but behind the makarios is the ASHRAIcem, ASHRAIhem of the Hebrew rather than barukh. Ashrai is used for the palpable and overflowwing blessing and presence of God rather than the consecratory state, The root of ashrai is used for "happiness" Change in word order for the this and the rest of beatitudes is permitted by grammar and brings the true and unexpected reversal which is the teaching of Christ.
4 Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the sad, for they shall be comforted.
4b Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. So truly blessed those that are grief-stricken. They will be comforted.
5 Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth.
5b Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. So truly blessed are the meek. They are the ones to inherit the earth.
6 Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. Blessed are they that hunger and thirst for justice, for they shall be satisfied. The use of the Greek accusative case connotes persons who actively do and pursue justice in their daily living.
6b Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. So truly blessed are those that hunger and thirst to see righteousness done. They will have their fill.
7 Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the merciful, for they shall receive mercy.
7b Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. So truly blessed are those that are merciful. Mercy will come to them.
8 Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. Blessed are the clean in heart, for they shall see God. The Greek word καθαρος means "clean." The English word pure has its roots in metallurgy and connotes a refined metal element separated in a furnace. That metaphor is used elsewhere in Scripture, but not here.
8b Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. So truly blesssed are the pure of heart. They will see God.
9 Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called the children of God.
9b Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God. So truly blessed are the Makers of Peace. It is Children of God that they will be called. developed from the Scripture and current in the 1st cent. and common in the synagogual liturgy - "The One who makes Peace in His Heights, He will make Peace upon us." As God is called according to this His quality, so those who follow Him in this, will also be called, a new name - "Children of God"


10 Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they that are persecuted for the sake of justice, for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven. The Greek preposition ενεκεν, used with the ablative, means "for the sake of." Here Matthew refers to those who suffer for the cause of justice, whereas before he referred to those who sought to deal justly themselves.
11 Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Blessed are you, when men shall denounce you, and persecute you, and say everything evil against you (falsely), for My sake. Some Greek manuscripts omit the word translated as "falsely."
12 Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you. Rejoice, and be very glad, because your reward is great in heaven: because they persecuted the prophets that came before you in the same manner.
13 Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted? it is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men. You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt has become bland, what shall it be salted with? It is then good for nothing, and fit only to be thrown out and trodden underfoot by men.
14 Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid. You are the light of the world. A city cannot be hidden if it stands on a hill.
15 Neither do men light a candle, and put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth light unto all that are in the house. And men do not light a candle and put it under a bushel basket, but on a candlestick; and it shines on everyone in the house.
16 Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father which is in heaven. Let your light shine in this manner in front of people, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father in heaven.
17 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil. Do not think that I have come to tear down the law or the prophets. I have not come to tear these things down, but rather to fulfil them.
18 For verily I say unto you, Till heaven and earth pass, one jot or one tittle shall in no wise pass from the law, till all be fulfilled. For I tell you truly: Until heaven and earth, not one jot or tittle shall pass from the law, in any way, shape or form, until everything is fulfilled. The Greek letter iota derives from the Hebrew י or yod, commonly called a "jot" on account of its small size. The phrase "one iota" survives today in common English and means exactly what it meant to St. Matthew: a tiny amount.

The prime-mark is the Hebrew gerash, called κεραια or keraia in Greek; this was called a "tittle" in Elizabethan English. The gerash, or the double-prime called gershayim (dual number), appeared often in Hebrew manuscripts to distinguish numbers (written with ordinary alphabetic letters) from regular text. Alternative view: the phrase 'not one jot or tittle' has passed into everyday English and is generally understood. 'iota' and 'prime-mark' are terms with which few people are familiar.

19 Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the kingdom of heaven: but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of heaven. And so if any person breaks even one of the least of these commandments, and shall so instruct others, that person shall be called the least in the Kingdom of heaven: but any person who does and teaches the commandments, shall be called great in the Kingdom of heaven.
20 For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven. For I tell you that unless your justification exceeds the justification of the scribes and the Pharisees, you cannot enter the Kingdom of heaven under any circumstances. The manner of that justification will be explained later. Jesus makes a point of setting the bar higher than any man can scale by relying on his own strength.
21 Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not kill; and whosoever shall kill shall be in danger of the judgment: You have heard that it was said in ancient times, "You shall not commit murder," and anyone guilty of committing murder would be liable for trial. The Greek verb φονευω literally means "I commit murder." Therefore, murder is specifically in view here.
22 But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire. But I tell you that any person who is angry with his brother shall be liable for trial, and anyone who says to his brother, "Airhead!" shall be liable to be brought before the council, but whoever says, "Moron!" shall be liable for the fire of hell. The Byzantine family of manuscripts, that form the basis of the Textus Receptus, add the word εικη or eiki, which means "without proper cause." But whether Jesus would necessarily recognize such a thing as a good cause to stay angry with someone is an open question.
23 Therefore if thou bring thy gift to the altar, and there rememberest that thy brother hath ought against thee; So if you are bringing your gift to the altar, that your brought has something against you,
24 Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift. leave your gift in front of the alter, go away, reconcile yourself to your brother first, and then come and offer your gift. One does not offer gifts to God while harboring anger in one's heart; such behavior is dishonoring to God and therefore frowned upon.
25 Agree with thine adversary quickly, whiles thou art in the way with him; lest at any time the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison. Be on good terms with your adversary quickly, while you are with him on the road; otherwise he might sometime deliver you to the judge, who will deliver you to the bailiff, and you find yourself thrown into prison. The Greek word υπηρετης or hyperetis means an attendant; the attendant of a judge would be called a bailiff.
26 Verily I say unto thee, Thou shalt by no means come out thence, till thou hast paid the uttermost farthing. I tell you truly: you shall not come out of that prison until you have paid back the last cent. The Greek word κοδραντης referred to the Roman quadrans, the smallest coin in the Roman coinage system. The British quarter-penny coin once called a "farthing" was the best equivalent in King James' day.

Alternative view: 'cent' is OK as a translation, just as 'farthing' was in the 17th century. Is a quarter-penny a coin which is still in circulation? 'Paid back the last cent' encompasses the meaning of the text nicely.

27 Ye have heard that it was said by them of old time, Thou shalt not commit adultery: You have heard that they said, "Do not commit adultery."
28 But I say unto you, That whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart. But I tell you that any man who looks at a woman with desire has already committed adultery with her in his heart.
29 And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell. But if your right eye causes you to stumble, take it out and throw it away from you: for it is better for you to have one of your body parts perish than that the whole body be thrown into hell.
30 And if thy right hand offend thee, cut if off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not that thy whole body should be cast into hell. And if your right hand causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it away from you: for it is better for you to have one of your body parts perish than that the whole body be thrown into hell.
31 It hath been said, Whosoever shall put away his wife, let him give her a writing of divorcement: It has been said, "Any man who divorces his wife should give her a bill of divorcement."
32 But I say unto you, That whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced committeth adultery. But I say to you that any man who divorces his wife, or fails to marry his betrothed for any reason other than improper conduct on her part, causes her to commit adultery; and any person who marries a divorced woman commits adultery. In ancient Jewish custom, betrothal was as binding as was actual marriage, in the same way that "earnest money contracts" are binding on would-be buyers and sellers of real estate. The only recognized grounds for not "closing the sale," that is, proceeding with the wedding, was improper conduct by the wife before the date of the wedding. Because Matthew, a Jew, was writing to Jews, he included this exception. Luke, who wrote primarily to Gentiles, did not need to, because Gentiles had no such custom as a binding betrothal.
33 Again, ye have heard that it hath been said by them of old time, Thou shalt not forswear thyself, but shalt perform unto the Lord thine oaths: Again you have heard that it was said in ancient times, "Do not swear falsely, but keep before the Lord any oath that you do swear."
34 But I say unto you, Swear not at all; neither by heaven; for it is God's throne: But I tell you: don't swear at all, neither by heaven, the throne of God;
35 Nor by the earth; for it is his footstool: neither by Jerusalem; for it is the city of the great King. nor by the earth, His footstool; nor by Jerusalem, the city of the great King,
36 Neither shalt thou swear by thy head, because thou canst not make one hair white or black. nor by your head, because you cannot make one hair white or black.
37 But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil. But let your word be a simple "Yes" or "No." Anything more than that comes from evil.
38 Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth: You have heard that it was said, "An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth." This was the original lex talionis and was given to restrain the retaliator from exacting a revenge greater than the original wrong.
39 But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on thy right cheek, turn to him the other also. But I tell you: Don't resit evil. To whomever hits you on the right cheek, turn the other cheek to him also. The Greek "τω πονηρω" can indicate several meanings: The most likely, because of the definite article "τω" is either that it means "the evil one" (a.k.a. Satan), an evil man, or evil in general. The Greek, "μη αντιστηναι" can be taken to mean, "do not resist," which is the most likely of translations given the example of Christ's ultimate sacrifice and also the overarching theme of non-resistance and pacifism that is so prolific in His teachings.
40 And if any man will sue thee at the law, and take away thy coat, let him have thy cloak also. And if any person sues you in a court of law, and takes your coat from you, let him have your cloak as well.
41 And whosoever shall compel thee to go a mile, go with him twain. And if anyone compels you to go a mile with him, go with him two miles. A Roman infantryman stationed in the provinces might compel a non-citizen of Rome to carry his backpack for him for one Roman mile, under Roman law and regulation. Jesus urges His followers, in this and other cases, to offer double what another person demands.
42 Give to him that asketh thee, and from him that would borrow of thee turn not thou away. Give to anyone who asks, and don't turn away from anyone who wants to borrow from you.
43 Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy. You have heard that it was said, "Love your neighbor, and disregard your enemy." The Greek word μισεω generally means "I disregard someone." The word connotes not wasting the effort of thought on the other person, rather than cultivating an attitude of anger. Again, Jesus is about to set an even higher standard of human behavior.
44 But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; But I tell you: Love your enemies, bless them who curse you, do good to those who disregard you, and pray for those who treat you spitefully and persecute you, Many Greek manuscripts mention only the first and fourth parts of the above, but all four are mutually consistent.
45 That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. so that you may be the children of your Father in heaven. He makes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. If God is no Respecter of persons in this regard, then what right have we to impose a sanction that God Himself does not impose?
46 For if ye love them which love you, what reward have ye? do not even the publicans the same? Because if you love them who love you, what reward do you have? Don't even tax collectors do the same thing?
47 And if ye salute your brethren only, what do ye more than others? do not even the publicans so? And if you exchange polite greetings only with your brothers, what are you doing, any more than others do? Don't even tax-collectors behave this way?
48 Be ye therefore perfect, even as your Father which is in heaven is perfect. You should therefore be perfect, even as your Father Who is in heaven is perfect. The word translated "perfect" is the Greek τελειος or teleios, which comes from the root τελε- meaning far, or at the end. The "perfect person" would be a finished work, having no room for improvement. Jesus necessarily sets the bar high, and encourages His followers to jump as high as they can. But only His substitutionary sacrifice will, in the end, complete the work for anyone.

Chapter 6

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 Take heed that ye do not your alms before men, to be seen of them: otherwise ye have no reward of your Father which is in heaven. Be careful not to perform your acts of charity in front of men, in order to be seen by them; otherwise you will have no reward from your Father in heaven.
2 Therefore when thou doest thine alms, do not sound a trumpet before thee, as the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, that they may have glory of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. So when you do your duty, do not sound a trumpet before you, the way the hypocrites do in the synagogues and in the streets, so that they may have glory from men. I tell you truly: they will get what's coming to them.
3 But when thou doest alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth: But when you give to the poor, don't let your left hand know what your right hand is doing, ἐλεημοσύνη: giving to the poor, not a duty...
4 That thine alms may be in secret: and thy Father which seeth in secret himself shall reward thee openly. so that your acts of charity may be hidden, and your Father, who sees in a hidden way Himself, will reward you openly.
5 And when thou prayest, thou shalt not be as the hypocrites are: for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen of men. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. And when you pray, don't be like the hypocrites. They love to pray when standing in the synagogues and in the street corners, so that they may be seen by men. I tell you truly: They will get what's coming to them.
6 But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and when thou hast shut thy door, pray to thy Father which is in secret; and thy Father which seeth in secret shall reward thee openly. But you, when you pray, go into your private room, and when you have shut your door, pray to your Father Who is hidden, and your Father, who sees in a hidden manner, will reward you openly.
7 But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking. And when you do pray, don't use vain repetitions, the way those of other nations do. They think that they'll be heard if they use many words.
8 Be not ye therefore like unto them: for your Father knoweth what things ye have need of, before ye ask him. So don't be like them. Your Father knows what things you need, before you ask Him.
9 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. Therefore, pray this way: "Our Father, who is in heaven, let your Name be Holy. This is The Lord's Prayer

The Greek form αγιασθητω is in the third-person present imperative or jussive form. This is the equivalent of an English jussive subjunctive.

10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Let Your kingdom come. Let Your will be done on earth as it is done in heaven. Again, the jussive imperative form appears here, not the indicative.
11 Give us this day our daily bread. Give us our daily bread today. In other words: see to our daily needs.
12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And forgive us of all our sins, just as we forgive those who sin against us.
13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. And do not lead us into testing, but keep us from the evil one. For yours is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever. Amen. The Byzantine manuscripts add "For yours is the kingdom," etc. Other manuscripts omit this part.
14 For if ye forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you: Because if you forgive men the wrongs they do, your heavenly Father will forgive you as well.
15 But if ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. But if you do not forgive men their wrongdoings, your Father will not forgive your wrongdoings either.
16 Moreover when ye fast, be not, as the hypocrites, of a sad countenance: for they disfigure their faces, that they may appear unto men to fast. Verily I say unto you, They have their reward. Furthermore, when you fast, do not be gloomy, like the hypocrites. They like to disfigure their faces so that they appear to other people to be fasting. I tell you truly: they will get what's coming to them.
17 But thou, when thou fastest, anoint thine head, and wash thy face; But you, when you fast, rub your head with oil, and wash your face, Anointment, or rubbing of the head with oil, was necessary in desert climates to hold the body water in.
18 That thou appear not unto men to fast, but unto thy Father which is in secret: and thy Father, which seeth in secret, shall reward thee openly. so that you do not look like a man fasting to other men, but to your Father Who is hidden, and your Father, who sees in a hidden manner, will reward you openly.
19 Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon earth, where moth and rust doth corrupt, and where thieves break through and steal: Don't store up treasures for yourselves on earth, where moths and rust make things unsightly and thieves break through and steal.
20 But lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, and where thieves do not break through nor steal: But store up treasures for yourselves in heaven, where neither moth nor rust can disfigure and no thief can break in or steal.
21 For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. For where your treasure is, your heart will also be.
22 The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. The lamp of the body is the eye. So if your eye is single, then your whole body will be bright.
23 But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness! But if your eye is evil, then your whole body will be dark. So if the light that is in you is dark, it is very dark indeed.
24 No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon. No one can serve two masters. He will either hate the one and love the other, or else hold to the one and treat the other with contempt. You cannot at the same time be a slave to God and wealth.
25 Therefore I say unto you, Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on. Is not the life more than meat, and the body than raiment? For this reason I tell you: stop worrying about your life, and what you will eat [or drink], or for your body, or what you will wear. Isn't life more than about food, and the body more than about clothes? The Greek verb is a negation of a present imperative. Such a construct tells the reader to stop doing something that he is presently doing or in the habit of doing.
26 Behold the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; yet your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are ye not much better than they? Look at the birds in the sky. They neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, but your heavenly Father feeds them. Aren't you much better than they are?
27 Which of you by taking thought can add one cubit unto his stature? Who among you, by worrying about it, can add one foot to his height?
28 And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin: And why do you worry about your clothes? Look at the lilies of the field, and how they grow. They don't work or spin.
29 And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. And yet I tell you that even Solomon in all his glory was never clothed like one of these.
30 Wherefore, if God so clothe the grass of the field, which to day is, and to morrow is cast into the oven, shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith? So if God can thus clothe the grass of the field, which is here today and thrown into the oven tomorrow, will he not clothe you so much more, you who have so little faith?
31 Therefore take no thought, saying, What shall we eat? or, What shall we drink? or, Wherewithal shall we be clothed? So stop worrying, and saying, "What shall we eat?" or "What shall we drink?" or "What shall we wear?"
32 (For after all these things do the Gentiles seek:) for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things. For the Gentiles seek after all these things, but your heavenly Father knows that you need all these things.
33 But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you. But first seek after the Kingdom of God, and His justice, and every one of these things will be added to you.
34 Take therefore no thought for the morrow: for the morrow shall take thought for the things of itself. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. So stop worrying about tomorrow, because tomorrow will worry about itself. The bad things that happen today are enough to worry about today.

Chapter 7

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 Judge not, that ye be not judged. Stop judging others, if you do not want to be judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye shall be judged: and with what measure ye mete, it shall be measured to you again. For with whatever judgment you judge, you will be judged, and with whatever measure you measure out to others, it will be measured to you.
3 And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? And why do you behold the mote in your brother's eye, and not consider the beam in your own eye?
4 Or how wilt thou say to thy brother, Let me pull out the mote out of thine eye; and, behold, a beam is in thine own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, "Let me take the mote out of your eye", while a beam is in your own eye?
5 Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye. Hypocrite! Throw the beam out of your own eye first, and then you will see clearly to throw out the mote in your brother's eye.
6 Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet, and turn again and rend you. Stop giving holy things to the dogs, and throwing your pearls in front of pigs, if you don't want them to trample them underfoot, and turn against you and tear you apart.
7 Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: Ask, and it will be given to you; seek, and you will find; knock, and it will be opened to you.
8 For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened. For everyone who asks, receives; he who seeks, finds; and to him who knocks, it is opened.
9 Or what man is there of you, whom if his son ask bread, will he give him a stone? Or what man is there among you who, if his son asks for bread, will give him a stone?
10 Or if he ask a fish, will he give him a serpent? Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a snake?
11 If ye then, being evil, know how to give good gifts unto your children, how much more shall your Father which is in heaven give good things to them that ask him? If you, then, being evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good things to those who ask Him?
12 Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them: for this is the law and the prophets. So however you would want men to treat you, treat them the same way. The law and the prophets require this.
13 Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: Enter in at the narrow gate. The gate is wide, and the road broad, that leads to destruction, and many people go in that way,
14 Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it. because the gate and the road that lead to life are narrow, and few people find it.
15 Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Watch out for false prophets. They come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly they are ravenous wolves.
16 Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? You will know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes from thorns, or figs from thistles?
17 Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit. In fact every good tree makes good fruit, but a corrupt tree makes bad fruit.
18 A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. A good tree cannot make bad fruit, nor a corrupt tree make good fruit.
19 Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. Every tree that does not make good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire.
20 Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them. Therefore, by their fruits you will know them.
21 Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. Not everyone who says to me, "Lord! Lord!" will enter into the Kingdom of heaven, but rather the one who does the will of My Father in heaven (will so enter).
22 Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? Many people will say to me in that day, "Lord! Lord! Haven't we told of the future in Your Name? Haven't we thrown demons out of people in Your Name? Haven't we done wonderful works in Your Name?"
23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity. And then I will tell them plainly: "I never knew you. Get away from me, you who work lawlessness."
24 Therefore whosoever heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them, I will liken him unto a wise man, which built his house upon a rock: So everyone who hears these things that I say, and does them, I will compare to a wise man, who built his house on a rock,
25 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not: for it was founded upon a rock. and the rain came down, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat on that house, and it did not fall, because it was founded on rock.
26 And every one that heareth these sayings of mine, and doeth them not, shall be likened unto a foolish man, which built his house upon the sand: And everyone who hears these things that I say, and does not do them, will be compared to a foolish man, who built his house on sand,
27 And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it. and the rain came down, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat on that house, and it fell, and fell with a great crash.
28 And it came to pass, when Jesus had ended these sayings, the people were astonished at his doctrine: And it came to pass, when Jesus had finished talking, that the crowds were amazed at His teaching,
29 For he taught them as one having authority, and not as the scribes. because when He taught them He spoke with and from authority, and not in the way the scribes commonly taught them.

Chapter 8

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 When he was come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed him. When He had come down from the mountain, great crowds of people followed Him.
2 And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And then a leper came and fell down at His feet, saying, "Lord, if You are willing, You can make me clean."
3 And Jesus put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean. And immediately his leprosy was cleansed. And He put out his hand, and touched him, and said, "I am willing. Be clean." And immediately the man's leprosy was cleansed. The leprosy in view here could be any of a number of contagious skin disorders common to the Middle East in that time, and not necessarily Hansen's Disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae.
4 And Jesus saith unto him, See thou tell no man; but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them. And Jesus told him, "Don't breathe a word of this to anyone, but go, show yourself to the priest, and offer the sacrifice that Moses commanded as a testimony to them." Someone might occasionally find himself free of the particular skin disorder that fell under the general heading of "leprosy." Such a man was always supposed to offer a sacrificial animal to give thanks to God.
5 And when Jesus was entered into Capernaum, there came unto him a centurion, beseeching him, And when Jesus had gone into Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, begging Him, A Roman centurion (Greek εκατονταρχ, literally, "leader of a hundred") was the lowest-ranking commissioned officer in the Roman army. He commanded a century of troops, consisting typically of eighty fighting men and twenty auxiliaries.
6 And saying, Lord, my servant lieth at home sick of the palsy, grievously tormented. and saying, "Lord, my servant is bedridden in my house, paralyzed and in great pain."
7 And Jesus saith unto him, I will come and heal him. And Jesus told him, "I will come and heal him."
8 The centurion answered and said, Lord, I am not worthy that thou shouldest come under my roof: but speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed. In answer, the centurion said, "Lord, I don't deserve to have you come under my roof. Just say the word, and my servant will be healed.
9 For I am a man under authority, having soldiers under me: and I say to this man, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doeth it. "For I am part of a chain of command, and I have soldiers under my command. I tell this man, "Go" and he goes, and another, "Come" and he comes, and my servant, "Do this," and he does it."
10 When Jesus heard it, he marvelled, and said to them that followed, Verily I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel. When Jesus heard that, he was amazed, and said to those that were following him, "I tell you truly, I have not found such great faith, even in Israel.
11 And I say unto you, That many shall come from the east and west, and shall sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, in the kingdom of heaven. "And I tell you that many will come from east and west, and will sit down with Abraham, and Isaac, and Jacob, in the Kingdom of heaven.
12 But the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth. "But the children of the Kingdom will be thrown out into outer darkness; there will be weeping and grinding of teeth."
13 And Jesus said unto the centurion, Go thy way; and as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. And his servant was healed in the selfsame hour. And Jesus said to the centurion, "Go, and as you have believed, so let it be done for you." And his servant was healed in that very hour.
14 And when Jesus was come into Peter's house, he saw his wife's mother laid, and sick of a fever. And when Jesus had come into Peter's house, He saw his wife's mother, bedridden and ill with fever.
15 And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them. And He touched her hand, and the fever left her, and she got up and waited on them.
16 When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick: That evening, they brought to Him many that were demon-oppressed, and He threw out the spirits with His word, and healed all the sick people,
17 That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses. so that this might be fulfilled that was spoken by Isaiah the prophet, who said, "He Himself took our infirmities, and bore our sicknesses."
18 Now when Jesus saw great multitudes about him, he gave commandment to depart unto the other side. Now when Jesus saw great crowds of people around him, He gave orders to leave for the other side.
19 And a certain scribe came, and said unto him, Master, I will follow thee whithersoever thou goest. And a certain scribe came, and told Him, "Master, I will follow you wherever you go."
20 And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head. And Jesus told him, "Foxes have holes, and the birds of the sky have nests, but the Son of man has no place to rest His head."
21 And another of his disciples said unto him, Lord, suffer me first to go and bury my father. And another of His pupils said to him, "Lord, first permit me to go to bury my father."
22 But Jesus said unto him, Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead. But Jesus told him, "Follow Me, and let the dead bury their own."
23 And when he was entered into a ship, his disciples followed him. And when He had gone into a boat, His pupils followed Him. This was a small fishing sloop, probably not more than fifteen feet from stem to stern.
24 And, behold, there arose a great tempest in the sea, insomuch that the ship was covered with the waves: but he was asleep. And behold, a great storm arose on the lake, so much that the boat was swamped with the waves. But He was asleep.
25 And his disciples came to him, and awoke him, saying, Lord, save us: we perish. And His pupils came to Him, and woke Him up, saying, "Lord, save us; we're dying!"
26 And he saith unto them, Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith? Then he arose, and rebuked the winds and the sea; and there was a great calm. And He said to them, "Why are you afraid, you of little faith?" Then He got up and judged the winds and the sea, and a great calm fell. Perhaps "... and watched the winds and the sea such that their chaotic turmoil ended." See Essay:Calming the Storm.
27 But the men marvelled, saying, What manner of man is this, that even the winds and the sea obey him! But the men were amazed, saying, "What kind of Man is this? Even the winds and the sea obey Him!"
28 And when he was come to the other side into the country of the Gergesenes, there met him two possessed with devils, coming out of the tombs, exceeding fierce, so that no man might pass by that way. And when He had come to the other side into the country of the Gadarenes, two demon-possessed men met Him, coming out of the tombs, so fierce that no man dared pass by that way. The Byzantine family renders this "Gergesenes." In fact, this was Gadite country, and so "Gadarene" is proper.
29 And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time? And suddenly they cried out, saying, "What business do we have with You, Jesus, Son of God? Have you come here to torment us before the time?" All demons know that God will deal definitively with them eventually, and still they demand more time, as if they can possibly escape the judgment that will come to them.
30 And there was a good way off from them an herd of many swine feeding. And a herd of many pigs was feeding a fair distance from them.
31 So the devils besought him, saying, If thou cast us out, suffer us to go away into the herd of swine. So the demons begged Him, saying, "If you're going to throw us out, let us go away into the herd of pigs."
32 And he said unto them, Go. And when they were come out, they went into the herd of swine: and, behold, the whole herd of swine ran violently down a steep place into the sea, and perished in the waters. And He said to them, "Go." And when they came out of the two men, they went into the herd of pigs. And the entire herd of pigs ran pell-mell down a steep bank into the sea, and drowned in the waters.
33 And they that kept them fled, and went their ways into the city, and told every thing, and what was befallen to the possessed of the devils. And those who had been keeping the pigs ran away, and went back into the city, and told about everything that had happened, and what had happened to the formerly demon-possessed men.
34 And, behold, the whole city came out to meet Jesus: and when they saw him, they besought him that he would depart out of their coasts. And then the entire city came out to meet Jesus, and when they saw Him, they begged Him to go away from their coasts.

Chapter 9

Verse King James Version Proposed Conservative Translation Analysis
1 And he entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into his own city. And He boarded a boat, and crossed the lake, and came into His own city.
2 And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Son, be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee. And they brought to Him a paralyzed man, lying on a pallet. And Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the paralytic, "Son, cheer up; your sins are forgiven you."
3 And, behold, certain of the scribes said within themselves, This man blasphemeth. And some of the scribes said among themselves, "This man is speaking blasphemy."
4 And Jesus knowing their thoughts said, Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts? And Jesus, Who knew what they were thinking, said, "Why do you think evil in your hearts?
5 For whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and walk? "For which would be easier to say: 'Your sins are forgiven you,' or 'Get up and walk'?
6 But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then saith he to the sick of the palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house. "But so that you may know that the Son of man has the authority on earth to forgive sins..." Then He said to the paralyzed man, "Get up, take up your pallet, and go to your house."
7 And he arose, and departed to his house. And he got up and went away to his house.
8 But when the multitudes saw it, they marvelled, and glorified God, which had given such power unto men. But when the crowds saw it, they were very much afraid, and gave glory to God, Who had given power like that to men. The Byzantine family has the verb θαυμαζω, which means, "I make someone say, 'Wow!'" But the best manuscripts say that the people in those crowds were afraid, not merely impressed with an amazing spectacle.
9 And as Jesus passed forth from thence, he saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom: and he saith unto him, Follow me. And he arose, and followed him. And as Jesus walked away from that place, He saw a man, Matthew by name, sitting in the tax office, and He said to him, "Follow Me." And he got up and followed Him.
10 And it came to pass, as Jesus sat at meat in the house, behold, many publicans and sinners came and sat down with him and his disciples. And it came to pass, as He reclined to dine in the house, many tax-gatherers and sinners came and reclined with Him and His pupils. Men in those days did not sit down at the dinnertable; they lay down on couches set alongside the table, held themselves up on one elbow, and reached for their food.
11 And when the Pharisees saw it, they said unto his disciples, Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners? And when the Pharisees saw this, they said to His pupils, "Why is your Master eating with tax-gatherers and sinners?" Pharisees constantly held themselves "holier than" the rest of their society. Tax-gatherers were the lowest of the low in Jewish society, primarily on account of the methods they employed. They were not direct government employees, but were private collection agents, to whom the Romans "farmed out" the tax-collection task. This "farming-out" caused great controversy even in the Senate of Rome and was one of the sorest points of anti-Roman resentment among the Jews.
12 But when Jesus heard that, he said unto them, They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. But when Jesus heard that, He told them, "The well do not need to see the doctor, but the sick do.
13 But go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice: for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. "But you go and learn what this means: 'I desire mercy, and not sacrifice.' For I haven't come here to call the just, but sinners to change their hearts."
14 Then came to him the disciples of John, saying, Why do we and the Pharisees fast oft, but thy disciples fast not? Then some followers of John the Baptist came to him, saying, "Why do we and the Pharisees fast often, but Your students do not fast?"
15 And Jesus said unto them, Can the children of the bridechamber mourn, as long as the bridegroom is with them? but the days will come, when the bridegroom shall be taken from them, and then shall they fast. And Jesus told them, "Can the members of the wedding party mourn, so long as the groom is with them? But a time will come when the groom will be taken from them, and then they will fast.
16 No man putteth a piece of new cloth unto an old garment, for that which is put in to fill it up taketh from the garment, and the rent is made worse. "No man puts a piece of new cloth onto an old garment. What is put in to fill the tear takes something from the old garment, and the hole is torn even wider.
17 Neither do men put new wine into old bottles: else the bottles break, and the wine runneth out, and the bottles perish: but they put new wine into new bottles, and both are preserved. Neither do men put freshly-squeezed grape juice into old skins; otherwise the skins break, the juice runs out, and the skins are ruined. Instead they put fresh juice into new skins, and both are preserved. The Greek word οινος means simply "the fruit of the vine." Wine in the modern sense of an alcoholic drink was not a common drink, especially among the Jews. Contrary to popular belief, connoisseurs of grape juice actively sought to stop it from fermenting and in fact had five different methods available to them to accomplish this. See, e.g., "Oinos: a discussion of the Bible wine question," by Leon C. Field (1883).
18 While he spake these things unto them, behold, there came a certain ruler, and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live. While He was speaking these things to them, behold, a certain ruler came to Him, and fell down at His feet, saying, "My daughter is dead even now. But come and lay Your hand on her, and she will live."
19 And Jesus arose, and followed him, and so did his disciples. And Jesus got up and followed him, and so did His students.
20 And, behold, a woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment: And behold, a woman, who had been hemorrhaging for twelve years, came behind Him, and touched the hem of His robe.
21 For she said within herself, If I may but touch his garment, I shall be whole. For she said to herself, "If I could just touch His robe, I will be made well."
22 But Jesus turned him about, and when he saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour. But Jesus turned around, and when He saw her, He said, "Daughter, take heart; your faith has made you well." And the woman was made well from that hour.
23 And when Jesus came into the ruler's house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise, And when Jesus came to the ruler's house, and saw the musicians and the crowds making a scene,
24 He said unto them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn. He told them, "Give Me room. This young woman is not dead; she is asleep." And they laughed at Him scornfully.
25 But when the people were put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose. But when the crowds were put outside, He went in, and took her by the hand, and the young woman got up.
26 And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land. And the news of this event went out into that entire land.
27 And when Jesus departed thence, two blind men followed him, crying, and saying, Thou Son of David, have mercy on us. And when Jesus went away from that place, two blind men followed Him, crying out and saying, "Have mercy on us, Son of David!"
28 And when he was come into the house, the blind men came to him: and Jesus saith unto them, Believe ye that I am able to do this? They said unto him, Yea, Lord. And when he had come into the house, the blind men came to Him. Jesus said to them, "Do you believe that I can do this?" They said to Him, "Yes, Lord."
29 Then touched he their eyes, saying, According to your faith be it unto you. Then He touched their eyes, saying, "According to your faith, let it work out for you."
30 And their eyes were opened; and Jesus straitly charged them, saying, See that no man know it. And their eyes were opened, and Jesus gave them strict orders, saying, "Don't let any man know anything about this."
31 But they, when they were departed, spread abroad his fame in all that country. But they, when they had left, spread the news of him in that entire country.
32 As they went out, behold, they brought to him a dumb man possessed with a devil. As they went out, some people brought to him a mute demon-possessed man.
33 And when the devil was cast out, the dumb spake: and the multitudes marvelled, saying, It was never so seen in Israel. And when the demon was thrown out, the mute spoke. The crowds said, "Wow! Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel!"
34 But the Pharisees said, He casteth out devils through the prince of the devils. But the Pharisees said, "He throws out demons by calling upon the leader of demons."
35 And Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people. And Jesus went around to all the cities and towns, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the Good News of the Kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people.
36 But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd. But when He saw the crowds, He was moved with compassion for them, because they were worried, and were scattered about like sheep without a shepherd.
37 Then saith he unto his disciples, The harvest truly is plenteous, but the labourers are few; Then He said to His students, "The harvest is truly bountiful, but the harvesters are few.
38 Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he will send forth labourers into his harvest. So pray to the Lord of the harvest, that He will send out workmen to gather in His harvest.

Matthew 10-19 (Translated)
Matthew 20-28 (Translated)

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