Richard Dawkins' loss of influence

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The Elevatorgate controversy and Richard Dawkins' commentary about Muslims has generated bad press and public relations problems for Dawkins.

Richard Dawkins is one of the principle founders of the New Atheism movement which is a form of militant atheism in terms of its rhetoric. In recent years, the prominence of the New Atheism movement has greatly waned (see: Decline of New Atheism).

The Elevatorgate controversy and Richard Dawkins' commentary about women and about Muslims have generated a significant amount of bad press and public relations problems for Dawkins (See also: Elevatorgate news stories and Richard Dawkins and women and Richard Dawkins and Islamophobia accusations).

Martin Robbins at New Statesman: Dawkins grasping for attention and relevance

See also: Elevatorgate news stories

In 2013, Martin Robbins wrote in the New Statesman concerning the public persona of Dawkins: "Increasingly though, his public output resembles that of a man desperately grasping for attention and relevance..."[1]

Recently, Richard Dawkins has been reduced to Tweeting provocative Twitter post in order to gain attention. After the predictable ensuing uproar, Dawkins half-heartedly apologizes for the provocative Tweets.[2]

Following of Richard Dawkins has markedly diminished

A 2011 portrait of Rebecca Watson. Watson was a central figure in the Elevatorgate scandal.

See also: Elevatorgate news stories and Blog posts on Elevatorgate

Although his following of Dawkian atheist has significantly waned post Elevatorgate and due to his generally abrasive manner, as noted above, he does retain a small cult following (See: Richard Dawkins' cult of personality and Atheist cults). In addition, Dawkins frequently faces accusations of engaging in Islamophobia (see: Richard Dawkins and Islamophobia accusations).

As noted above, Dawkins is a leading figure in the New Atheism movement. The movement was called a cult by the agnostic, journalist Bryan Appleyard in a 2012 article in the New Statesman in which he describes the abusive behavior of New Atheists.[3] See also: Atheist cults

Decline of New Atheism

See also: Decline of New Atheism

On November 6, 2015, the New Republic published an article entitled, Is the New Atheism dead?[4]

In 2015, the atheist author Joshua Kelly wrote:

...since the death of Hitchens: angry atheism lost its most charismatic champion. Call it what you like: New Atheism, fire-brand atheism, etc., had a surge with the Four Horsemen in the middle of the last decade and in the last four years has generally peetered out to a kind that is more docile, politically correct, and even apologetic.[5]

In addition, New Atheism's abrasiveness/aggressiveness caused it to wore thin over time in terms of its public relations (see also: Atheism and public relations).

Initial loss of web traffic to Richard Dawkins's website post Elevatorgate

According to the web traffic tracking company Quantcast, the web traffic of Richard Dawkins' website fell in 2012.[6] By October 2014, the web traffic for his website fell to a lower level according to Quantcast.[7]

In October of 2012, Rebecca Watson published a story about Elevatorgate and its aftermath in Slate entitled, It Stands to Reason, Skeptics Can Be Sexist Too: I spoke out about sexual harassment among atheists and scientists. Then came the rape threats.[8]

The web traffic was measured via Quantcast which directly measured Dawkins' website traffic via embedded code on his website.[9]

Web traffic of Richard Dawkins' website has seen a dramatic drop

The above graph shows the monthly website traffic to Richard Dawkins' website as of June 22, 2015 in terms of unique monthly web visitors.[10] As you can see above, in 2012, Richard Dawkins saw a very large decrease in web traffic.

The website traffic is measured via Quantcast which directly measures Dawkins' website traffic via embedded code on his website.[9]

Alexa ranking of Richard Dawkins' website

See also: Alexa rankings of Richard Dawkins' website

According to Alexa, Richard Dawkins website lost a large amount of its global market share during to period between 2010 and the beginning portion of 2012.
In 2016, Richard Dawkins' website lost a considerable amount of global market share according to the web traffic tracking company Alexa.
In 2015, Richard Dawkins' website fell in terms of its Alexa ranking.
In the latter half of 2016, Richard Dawkins' website saw a significant decline in its Alexa ranking.
In 2016 and the in the beginning portion of 2017, the global internet market share of of Richard Dawkins' website has been falling according to the web traffic tracking company Alexa.
In March of 2017, according to Alexa, Richard Dawkins' website was experiencing a steep decline in terms of its global market share.
In April of 2017, according to Alexa, Richard Dawkins' website continued to experience a steep decline in terms of its global market share.

Compete.com web traffic data for Richard Dawkins website

According to the web traffic tracking Compete.com, Richard Dawkins website saw a loss of web traffic during the period between 4/2011 to 4/2012.

Elevatorgate news stories

See also: Elevatorgate news stories

Below is a list of news stories about the Elevatorgate scandal which involved Richard Dawkins and Rebecca Watson.

Rebecca Watson's article appearing in a news outlet

Subsequent articles mentioning Elevatorgate incident

Diminishing meme of Richard Dawkins and the rising memes of Jesus Christ and global creationism

See also: Global Christianity and Global creationism

Richard Dawkins coined the term and the concept of a meme. The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a meme as "an idea, behavior or style that spreads from person to person within a culture."

Professor Eric Kaufmann told a secular audience in Australia: "The trends that are happening worldwide inevitably in an age of globalization are going to affect us."[11] See: Decline of global atheism

Johns Hopkins University Press reported in 2014 about global creationism: "Over the past forty years, creationism has spread swiftly among European Catholics, Protestants, Jews, Hindus, and Muslims, even as anti-creationists sought to smother its flames."[12] See also: Evolutionary indoctrination

Atheists declaring that Richard Dawkins is now a liability to the atheist movement

See also: Atheism and public relations

Post Elevatorgate and subsequent to his various embarrassing/inflammatory Twitter posts, many atheists are now asking if he is a liability to the atheist movement.[13]

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