Moore's Law

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Moore's Law is the term commonly used to describe the 1965 prediction by Intel Corporation co-founder Gordon Moore that holds that the number of transistors that can economically be incorporated in an integrated circuit roughly doubles every two years. [1]

Contents

Background

When Moore in 1965 observed that the number of components on integrated circuits seemed to double regularly, this fact was known to many people working in the area. Indeed, it took over a decade, during which Moore had become the co-founder of Intel and its President and CEO, before this observation was called Moore's Law. [2]

Examples Using Intel Processors

The following table shows the progression of the number of transistors embedded in a single Intel Chip over time[3]:

Year Intel Chip Model # of Transistors
1971 4004 2,300
1974 8080 4,500
1978 8086 29,000
1982 i286 134,000
1985 i386 275,000
1989 i486 1,200,000
1993 Pentium 3,100,000
1995 Pentium Pro 5,500,000
1997 Pentium II 7,500,000
1999 Pentium III 9,500,000
2001 Pentium 4 / Xeon 42,000,000
2002 Pentium M 55,000,000
2002 Itanium 2 220,500,000
2005 Pentium D 291,000,000
2007 Xeon 582,000,000
2007 Xeon (Penryn) 820,000,000

References

  1. [1] Intel page on Moore's Law
  2. http://www.firstmonday.org/issues/issue7_11/tuomi/
  3. http://www.intel.com/technology/timeline.pdf

Additional Reading

Sixty Years of the Transistor - Intel
The Lives and Death of Moore's Law

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