Moshe Carmeli

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Moshe Carmeli

Moshe Carmeli (1933-2007) was Albert Einstein Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Ben Gurion University in Israel and president of the Israel Physical Society[1] who in the early 1990s developed his new theory named cosmological special relativity (CSR) and then his general theory which included matter.[2] In 1996, before the supernovae experiments results become known, he was first to predict using this new CSR theory the possibility that the universe expansion is accelerating.[1][2][3] According to John Hartnett the Carmeli cosmology is revolutionary in its implementation and interpretation. Carmeli approached the problem of explaining the structure of the universe using new physics that primarily involves a new dimension - the radial velocity of the galaxies in the expanding universe. In his theory, no explicit cosmological constant[note 1] or any dark energy is employed. Carmeli's model is a challenge to standard big bang theory, because it shows that a model other than Friedmann-Lemaître models can describe the large structure of the universe without the two needed add-on fudge factors: hypothetical 'dark' matter and 'dark' energy.[2]

The University of Victoria in British Columbia summarized about him: "Carmeli has suggested that the universe's expansion must be constantly accelerating, and that time is therefore relative; in other words, it can only be measured relative to the position and velocity of the measurer. This also means that time must have moved more slowly in the past when the universe was smaller and moving more slowly. Carmeli's work has posed an intriguing set of problems for theoretical physicists and has even been investigated by scholars for its philosophical and religious implications."[5]

Contents

Publications

Books

  • Cosmological Special Relativity (1997, 2002)[1]

The book presents a new cosmological special relativity theory along the lines of Einstein's theory on ordinary special relativity.


Papers

  • Fundamental Approach to the Cosmological Constant Issue[4]
  • Cosmological Relativity: Determining the Universe by the Cosmological Redshift[6]
  • Derivation of the Tully-Fisher Law from General Relativity Theory: Doubts about the Existence of Halo Dark Matter[7]

See also

External Links

Notes

  1. cf."Although the theory has no cosmological constant, we extract from it its equivalence and show that Λ = 1.934 × 10-35 s-2. This value of Λ is in excellent agreement with measurements."[4]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Moshe Carmeli (2002). Cosmological Special Relativity, The Large-Scale Structure of Space, Time and Velocity, 2nd Edition. World Scientific Publishing, 129, 207. ISBN 9-789-02-4936-5. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Hartnett, John (2007). Starlight, Time and the New Physics. Creation Ministries International, 43, 56, 63, 122. ISBN 978-0-949-906687. “In 1996, using his new theory, Carmeli predicted that the universe must be accelerating.” 
  3. Carmeli, Moshe (1996). Cosmological General Relativity. 5. Communications in Theoretical Physics. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Moshe Carmeli (20 November 2002). [www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0217751X02013253 "Fundamental Approach to the Cosmological Constant Issue"]. International Journal of Modern Physics A 17 (29). Template:Hide in printTemplate:Only in print. www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0217751X02013253. 
  5. International Visiting Scholars Bring Range of Expertise to UVic: Moshe Carmeli - Re-Envisioning Relativity. The University of Victoria. “Astrophysicist Moshe Carmeli is Albert Einstein Professor of Theoretical Physics at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva, Israel. He has also done important work at the University of Maryland and for the US Department of Defense as well as being involved in the nomination process for the Nobel Prize in Physics. Re-envisioning Einstein's theories of Special and General Relativity and building on the work of Edwin Hubble, Dr. Carmeli has suggested that the universe's expansion must be constantly accelerating, and that time is therefore relative; in other words, it can only be measured relative to the position and velocity of the measurer. This also means that time must have moved more slowly in the past when the universe was smaller and moving more slowly. Carmeli's work has posed an intriguing set of problems for theoretical physicists and has even been investigated by scholars for its philosophical and religious implications. He is currently on sabbatical at UVic doing research on subatomic particles with UVic physicist Fred Cooperstock, with whom Dr. Carmeli has a longstanding personal and professional relationship.”
  6. Moshe Carmeli (3 Nov 2001). Cosmological Relativity: Determining the Universe by the Cosmological Redshift.
  7. Silvia Behar, Moshe Carmeli (19 Jul 1999). Derivation of the Tully-Fisher Law from General Relativity Theory: Doubts about the Existence of Halo Dark Matter 1397-1404.
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