National Federation for Constitutional Liberties

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The National Federation for Constitutional Liberties was cited by Roosevelt Attorney General Francis Biddle as "part of what Lenin called the solar system of organizations, ostensibly having no connection with the Communist Party, by which Communists attempt to create sympathizers and supporters of their program;"[1] Truman Attorney General Tom Clark cited the Federation as subversive and Communist.[2] and it was redesignated on April 27, 1953 pursuant to Executive Order No. 10450.[3]

The Special Committee on Un-American Activities cited the National Federation as "one of the viciously subversive organisations of the Communist Party;"[4] the Committee on Un-American Activities reported that it was among a "maze of organisations" which were "spawned for the alleged purpose of defending civil liberties in general but actually intended to protect Communist subversion from any penalties under law."[5]

See also

References

  1. Congressional Record, September 24, 1942, p. 7687.
  2. Press releases, December 4, 1947 and September 21, 1948; cited in report prepared from the public files of the House Committee on Un-American Activities for Senator William E. Jenner, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security, October 20 1953, reproduced in Who Was Frank Marshall Davis?, Cliff Kincaid and Herbert Romerstein, p. 12-14.
  3. Executive Order 10450.
  4. Report of March 29, 1944, p. 50; also cited in Reports of June 25, 1942 and January 2, 1943, report prepared from files of HUAC for Senator William E. Jenner, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security, October 20 1953, reproduced in Who Was Frank Marshall Davis?, Cliff Kincaid and Herbert Romerstein, p. 12-14.
  5. Report of September 2, 1947, p. 3; report prepared for Senator Jenner, Chairman of the SISS, October 20 1953, reproduced in Who Was Frank Marshall Davis?, Cliff Kincaid and Herbert Romerstein, p. 12-14.
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