Nikola Tesla

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Nikola Tesla (July 9, 1856-January 7, 1943) was a Serbian-American electrical engineer, inventor and physicist who contributed to many of the developments in the field of electricity. "It’s generally agreed that Tesla was an earlier inventor of radio than Guglielmo Marconi, who won the patent and a Nobel Prize."[1]


He pioneered the eventual adaptation of alternating current, which is more efficient than direct current.

The SI unit measuring magnetic flux density or magnetic induction (commonly known as the magnetic field), is named the tesla, in his honor (see induction motor).

He was Thomas Edison's main rival at the end of the 19th century, even surpassing him in fame in the 1890s.

Despite the international fame he received as a result of his work involving alternating current, he died relatively penniless in a New York hotel room.

Quotes

  • The gift of mental power comes from God, Divine Being, and if we concentrate our minds on that truth, we become in tune with this great power. My Mother had taught me to seek all truth in the Bible; therefore I devoted the next few months to the study of this work.[2]
  • I made a further careful study of the Bible, and discovered the key in Revelation.[3]

Notes

  1. New Yorker magazine
  2. Nikola Tesla (1982). My inventions: The autobiography of Nikola Tesla. NuVision Publications LLC, 41. “Up to that time I never realized that I possed any particular gift of discovery, but the Lord Rayleigh, whom I considered an ideal man of science, had said so, and if that was the case, I felt that I shold concentrate on some big idea. At this time, as many other times in the past, my tought turned towards my mother's teaching. The gift of mental power comes from God, Divine Being, and if we concentrate our minds on that truth, we become in tune with this great power. My Mother had taught me to seek all truth in the Bible; therefore I devoted the next few months to the study of this work.” 
  3. Arthur H. Matthews (1973). The Wall of Light: Nikola Tesla and the Venusian Space Ship, the X-12. Health Research Books, 27. “It seemed a hopeless undertaking, but I made up my mind to try it and immediately on my return to the United States in the summer of 1892, after a short visit to my friends in Watford, England; work was begun which was to me all the more attractive, because a means of the same kind was necessary for the successful transmission of energy without wires. At this time I made a further careful study of the Bible, and discovered the key in Revelation.” 

See also