Oslo Accords

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The Oslo Accords were the culmination of a series of negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians. The accords allowed for the eventual creation of a Palestinian state, but in return the Palestinians gave up the right of return for "refugees" as well as any hope of reclaiming any Israeli land that they believed they had rights to.

The Declaration of Principles (DOP), also known as the Oslo Accords, were approved in 1993 with Yassir Arafat signing for the Palestine Liberation Organization and Shimon Peres signing for Israel. The accords required Israel to withdraw from parts of the Gaza Strip and West Bank and recognize a new Palestinian Authority. More controversial issues concerning Jerusalem, refugees, Israeli settlements and borders were left undecided.

Extremists on both sides of the Israel-Arab question were not satisfied with the accords. Yitzhak was assassinated by a Zionist extremist for giving up Judea and Samaria, and Yasser Arafat lost much of his support for recognizing the right of Israel to exist.

Further reading

  • Deeb, Dennis J. The Collapse of Middle East Peace: The Rise & Fall of the Oslo Peace Accords (2003) excerpt and text search

Further reading

  • Tucker, Spencer C., ed. The Encyclopedia of the Arab-Israeli Conflict A Political, Social, and Military History (4 vol. 2008)
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