Pamela Geller

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Pamela Geller (b. 1958) is an author, conservative activist, and journalist most known for her Atlas Shrugs website and her persistent opposition to Islam. She is consistently attacked by liberals of all stripes including Media Matters and CAIR. Geller is a staunch opponent of the Ground Zero Mosque. She co-founded the Freedom Defense Initiative with Robert Spencer and the Stop Islamization of America, which exposes Muslim extremism. Many of Geller's Op-Eds have appeared in The Washington Times, Newsmax, Human Events, Breitbart Big Government, WorldNetDaily, the American Thinker, Israel National News, and other publications. Her new book is being published by Simon and Schuster called The Post-American Presidency: The Obama Administration's War on America. She was born and raised in New York City.

Attacked by terrorist jihadists

On May 3, 2015 in response to a jihadist Muslim meeting held in Garland, Texas after the Charlie Hebdo magazine massacre (in which the magazine had routinely presented drawings of Mohammed, pictorial representations of whom is regarded as prohibited by some in the Muslim religion, and as a result had their offices assaulted by jihadists who killed twelve people) Geller held a drawing contest of Mohammed at the same venue. During the meeting two jihadist Muslims from Phoenix had arrived armed to engage in a terrorist attack against Geller and the participants. They were both killed by police officers, but managed to shoot a security guard before being stopped.

The response by most commentators in the media to the event offered tepid support at best to Geller if not blame, despite the fact that through preparing for the risks involved, she had engaged and defeated the same type of jihadists who had murdered the twelve Parisian employees of the Charlie Hebdo magazine whose free speech rights she was championing by means of the gathering, the massacre having earlier inspired an enormous outpouring of opposition in its political dimension as an outrage against free speech rights, bearing the motto "Je suis Charlie [I am Charlie]". At least one conservative journalist noted the probable reason for the unanimated reception by journalists was that Geller did not also commission drawings critical of religious figures such as Jesus regarded as enemies of the large proportion of journalists who are leftist as Charlie Hebdo had.[1]

External Links


  1. Stephens, Bret (May 11, 2015). "In defense of Pamela Geller". The Wall Street Journal website/Opinion. Retrieved on May 13, 2015.