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A sample resume

A resume, (also: resumé, résumé) is a written record outlying previous work history and educational experiences a job seeker submits to a prospective employer. Because it is the first thing employers look at when screening applications, it is very important, and there are many books and paid consultants that offer advice on writing good resumes. For most positions, a resume is typically no more than one page long. Any more than a page is rarely read, according to research. In fact, some studies say that no more than the first half of resumes are read.[1][2]

Job seekers in research and academia usually use a form of resume known as a curriculum vitae or CV. This may be more extensive than a resume, and would be expected to include a list of all of the applicant's scientific publications.


There is no single right way to design a resume, but there are certain norms. For example, the person's name, phone number, and address is usually printed at the top of each resume. Below this, sections for employment experience, volunteer work, education, and sometimes awards and accomplishments are listed. It is also common for an "objective statement" to be listed on the resume, which is usually a sentence describing the person's desires, intentions, and goals.