Richard Dawkins Books

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Instead of making any useful or meaningful contribution to his chosen field of ethology Richard Dawkins choose to write books.

Richard Dawkins has authored or substantially co-authored 10 books, mostly on evolution.

  • The Selfish Gene- (1976) About how everything in behavior is supposedly driven by selfish replication.
  • The Extended Phenotype- (1982) About how far small genetic variations reach, primarily mortaring over cracks in his original book.
  • The Blind watchmaker- (1986) A book which speciously alleges the appearance of design is proof that there was no designer
  • River out of Eden- (1995)
  • Climbing Mount Improbable- (1996) A somewhat paradoxical text arguing that improbably events are really probable, flying in the face of modern statistics.
  • Unweaving the Rainbow- (1998) A book about how explaining away mysteries doesn't destroy the romance of them, in the process completely destroying the romance of several mysteries.
  • A Devil's Chaplain- (2003) A collection of essays and articles from various figures that Dawkins uses and comments on to attempt to support his various specious arguments. The title is based on a quote form Darwin, "What a book a Devil's Chaplain might write on the clumsy, wasteful, blundering low and horridly cruel works of nature." While Darwin rejected such a role for himself, Dawkins seems to have taken it on very willingly.
  • The Ancestor's Tale- (2004) A very repetitive book discussing the benefits of several characteristics of living species, and attempting to link them together in a lineage for mankind
  • The God Delusion- (2006) A book where he attempts to show that belief in God is irrational.
  • The Greatest Show on Earth- 2009 subtitled the evidence for evolution. Dawkins personal summary and narrative about why everyone should have faith in evolution. Counterexamples not included. Dr. Jonathan Sarfati recently published the book The Greatest Hoax on Earth which rebuts Richard Dawkins' recent book The Greatest Show on Earth.[1]

References

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