Sally Yates

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Sally Yates
Sally Yates.jpeg
United States Deputy Attorney General
From: January 10, 2015 – January 30, 2017
Predecessor James M. Cole
Successor Rod Rosenstein
Information
Party Democrat

Sally Yates served as Deputy Attorney General in the Obama Administration throughout the period of time the Obama Department of Justice was accused of abusing the FISA process and constitutional rights of American citizens. Yates served as Acting Attorney General for the first ten days of the Trump administration.

One month after Donald Trump announced his intention to seek the presidency in 2015, Yates blocked the Office of Inspector General (OIG) from having oversight of the DOJ National Security Division (DOJ-NSD).[1] The OIG, Michael Horowitz, requested oversight and Yates responded with a lengthy 58-page legal explanation essentially denying the request. All of the DOJ was subject to oversight, except the National Security Division. [2] Horowitz raised concerns that his office would be required to seek the DOJ's permission. That procedure is “inconsistent with the Inspector General Act, impairs the OIG’s independence, and fails to account for the over 20 year record of Department and FBI compliance with OIG document requests."[3]

Yates was referred for criminal investigation by Congress in April 2018 for her role in signing the Carter Page FISA warrant application containing unverified and/or false information from the Clinton-Steele dossier (possible violations of 18 USC 242, 18 USC 1505 and 1515b).

Clinton email scandal

Main article: Hillary Clinton email scandal
The New York Post reported former State Dept. Inspector General Howard J. Krongard said:
“It will never get to an indictment." For one, any criminal referral to the Justice Department from the FBI “will have to go through four loyal Democrat women” — Assistant Attorney General Leslie Caldwell, who heads the department’s criminal division; Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates; Attorney General Loretta Lynch; and top White House adviser Valerie Jarrett.[4][5]

See also

References