Secular Talk

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Secular Talk is a left-leaning online talk show on YouTube, hosted by Kyle Kulinski. The program focuses on modern American politics from a strongly liberal and secular perspective. Kulinski is a New Atheist/agnostic and admires Richard Dawkins, but he does not always agree with other New Atheists on particular points.[1] Like many other agnostics/atheists, Kyle Kulinski engages in frequent profanity (see: Atheism and profanity).[2]

History

Kulinski currently resides in New Rochelle, New York. He started the Secular Talk YouTube channel in 2008, and he joined The Young Turks network in 2013.

Format

He has a radio show on BlogTalkRadio that airs live on weekdays (at 4pm Eastern Time), where he spends 1 1/2 hours recording segments that will later be uploaded on his YouTube channel. These segments include things such as rebuttals of statements by Christian journalists/radio hosts, reporting news and commenting on them from a liberal and secular perspective.

Ideological views of Kyle Kulinski

  • He opposes the pro-life position, but objects to abortions performed after viability. See also: Abortion and atheism
  • He has indicated that pro-choice social democrat Bernie Sanders is his preference for the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee. See also: Secular left
  • He believes in man-made global warming despite the evidence against it and the repeated scientific frauds/scandals of its proponents (see also: Climategate).
  • He is generally pro-feminism, but is against third-wave feminism.
  • He is a social democrat and admires social democratic Scandinavian countries.
  • He supports same-sex marriage. See also: Atheism and homosexuality
  • He supports government funding for sex reassignment surgery.
  • He is a proponent of Obamacare and wants to expand it into a Medicare-for-all system.
  • He supports a single-payer government funded health-care system and supports free college for all.
  • He believes in high taxation of wealthy individuals and corporations.
  • He is a critic of Islam. See also: Atheism vs. Islam
  • He is a critic of Israel.

Kulinski's "best argument for atheism" video offers invalid argument for atheism

See also: Kyle Kulinkski's "best argument for atheism" video

In a YouTube video, Kulinski says the best argument for atheism is:

Where did the God who created all this intricacy and complexity come from? Because by definition that God would would need to be way more complex and way more intricate. Because in order to create all of this complexity, you have to be more complex and more intricate if you you have the ability to create all of this and yourself exist and be super complex and intricate.[3]

Kulinsk's video is directed towards deists.[4] Yet, it is extremely common for deists to posit that God is eternal (Historically, this has been the case as well).[5][6][7][8][9]

According to Deism.com:

One key difference between Deism and the "revealed" religions is that Deists don't believe faith is required to believe in God. This quote from Voltaire sums it up, "What is faith? Is it to believe that which is evident? No. It is perfectly evident to my mind that there exists a necessary, eternal, supreme, and intelligent being. This is no matter of faith, but of reason."[10]

For additional information, please see: Kyle Kulinkski's "best argument for atheism" video

Opposition to Christianity

He frequently criticizes Christian journalists, public figures and politicians.

See also

External links

References

  1. New Atheists Vs Progressives
  2. New Atheists Vs Progressives
  3. The Best Argument For Atheism by Kyle Kulinski, Secular Talk YouTube channel
  4. The Best Argument For Atheism by Kyle Kulinski, Secular Talk YouTube channel
  5. Welcome to deism at Deism.com
  6. The Posthumous works of the Reverend and pious James M'Gready, Volume 1 By James McGready, page 2[1]
  7. “The Piety of the English Deists”
  8. The English Deists: Studies in Early Enlightenment By Wayne Hudson, page 73[2]
  9. The Influence and Legacy of Deism in Eighteenth Century America
  10. Welcome to deism at Deism.com