Sikivu Hutchinson

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Atheist Sikivu Hutchinson says that atheist organizations generally focus on church/state separation and creationism issues and not on the concerns the less affluent African-American population faces.[1] Hutchinson also mentioned that church organizations significantly help poor African-Americans.[2] See also: Atheism and uncharitablenss

Sikivu Hutchinson is an American atheist, feminist and author. In her book Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics and the Value Wars, Hutchinson takes issue with the social conservatism of black churches on the issues of abortion and homosexuality.

In 1999, Hutchinson graduated from New York University with a doctorate in Performance Studies.

On token efforts to extend racial minorities leadership positions in atheist organizations

See also: Western atheism and race

On October 9, 2014, the atheist Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson declared:

Despite frequent tokenistic calls for “diversity” within the “movement,” there are virtually no people of color in executive management positions in any of the major secular, atheist, or Humanist organizations —notable exceptions being Debbie Goddard of Center for Inquiry and Maggie Ardiente of American Humanist Association. People of color are constantly bombarded with claims of separatism, reverse discrimination, and “self-segregation” when they point to the absence of social justice, anti-racist community organizing, coalition-building, and visibility among secular organizations. After the Washington Post article, the vitriol and denialism among the “We are All Africans” white atheists was off the chain. This illustrates yet again that sticking a few of us on conference panels or secular boards is nothing but cheap appeasement.[3]

Sikivu Hutchinson's criticism of RDF and Center for Inquiry merger

See also: Western atheism and race

Sikivu Hutchinson speaking ath the Center for Inquiry.

Sikivu Hutchinson wrote:

The recent merger of the secular organization Center for Inquiry (CFI) and the Richard Dawkins Foundation (RDF) has been dubbed atheism's supergroup moment. Acknowledging the two organizations' outsized presence in the atheist world, Religion News Service acidly declared it a "royal wedding". The partnership, which gives Richard Dawkins a seat on the CFI board, smacks of a vindication of Dawkins' toxic, reactionary brand of damn-all-them-culturally-backward-Western-values-hating- Muslims New Atheism. As one of the most prominent global secular organizations, CFI's all-white board looks right at home with RDF's lily white board and staff.[4]

Atheist organizations focus too much on church-state issues and on creationism

See also: Atheism and uncharitableness

In June 2014, Sikivu Hutchinson wrote in the Washington Post that atheist organizations generally focus on church/state separation and creationism issues and not the concerns the less affluent African-American population faces.[5] Hutchinson also mentioned that church organizations do offer significant help to poor African-Americans.[6]

Hutchinson indicates a vacuum in secular social justice leadership

See also: Atheism and social justice and Atheism and politics

According to Hutchinson, there is a "vacuum in secular social justice leadership" and that is why she and other skeptics founded the People of Color Beyond Faith network.[7] Hutchinson says about the network, "We’re not only interested in working with nonbelievers and secularists of color, but also with progressive faith organizations that share a similar vision."[8] See also: Atheism and liberal Christianity alliances

Sikivu Hutchinson speaking at a women's conference. See also: Atheism and women

Hutchinson said about a conference of the People of Color Beyond Faith network:

The conference is designed to bring social justice activism to the fore of radical Humanism and atheism as it relates to the particular struggles of people of color within the context of hyper-segregation, downward economic mobility, mass incarceration and the neoliberal privatization of public education in black and Latino schools. These systems have had the most devastating impact on our communities and have only intensified the grip of organized religion precisely because there is no comprehensive social welfare safety net that addresses these disparities.

We hope that secular participants will come away from the conference with community contacts and action items to pursue within Humanist advocacy. We’re also looking for greater traction with community-based and progressive faith organizations to coalition-build around these issues. These are the kinds of organizations that I’ve worked with over the past several years on transit racism and school-to-prison pipeline education for youth of color in South L.A.; but the issues they address are not deemed to be central to secular Humanism because secular Humanism has traditionally been defined by white elites.[9]

Sikivu Hutchison featured in a national billboard campaign

In 2012, Hutchinson was featured in a national billboard campaign of prominent black skeptics which was launched by the organization African Americans for Humanism.[10] In a Los Angeles billboard, Hutchinson was featured and so was the author Zora Neale Hurston, a folklorist of African-American culture who wrote about being a skeptic in her essay "Religion."[11]

Hutchinson's criticism of black comedian Steve Harvey

See also: Western atheism and race and African-American atheists and loneliness

Hitchinson takes issue with the black comedian Steve Harvey's contention that atheists are amoral (see also: Atheism and morality).[12] Hutchinson also takes issues with Harvey's contention that African-Americans should shun black atheists and that most black atheists are quite likely "race-traitors".[13] Hutchinson contends that Harvey's "race-traitors" comment implies that African-Americans are so religious that to "step outside the fold is not only the spawn of Beelzebub, but someone that is basically disavowing their native cultural and racial heritage".[14]

Books

  • White Nights, Black Paradise, Infidel Books (2015)
  • Godless Americana. Infidel Books. (2013).
  • Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics and the Value Wars. Infidel Press. (2011).
  • Imagining Transit: Race, Gender, and Transportation Politics in Los Angeles (Travel Writing Across the Disciplines). Peter Lang Publishing. (2003)

See also

References

  1. Atheism has a big race problem that no one’s talking about by Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson, Washington Post June 16, 2014
  2. Atheism has a big race problem that no one’s talking about by Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson, Washington Post June 16, 2014
  3. Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference, Chris Stedman, Religious Service News, Oct 9, 2014
  4. #AtheismSoWhite: Atheists of Color Rock Social Justice by Sikivu Hutchinson
  5. Atheism has a big race problem that no one’s talking about by Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson, Washington Post June 16, 2014
  6. Atheism has a big race problem that no one’s talking about by Dr. Sikivu Hutchinson, Washington Post June 16, 2014
  7. [Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference - See more at: http://chrisstedman.religionnews.com/2014/10/09/atheism-social-justice-sikivu-hutchinson-first-people-color-beyond-faith-conference Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference], Chris Stedman, 2014
  8. [Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference - See more at: http://chrisstedman.religionnews.com/2014/10/09/atheism-social-justice-sikivu-hutchinson-first-people-color-beyond-faith-conference Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference], Chris Stedman, 2014
  9. [Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference - See more at: http://chrisstedman.religionnews.com/2014/10/09/atheism-social-justice-sikivu-hutchinson-first-people-color-beyond-faith-conference Atheism and social justice: Sikivu Hutchinson on the first People of Color Beyond Faith conference], Chris Stedman, 2014
  10. Winston&, Kimberly. "Blacks say atheists were unseen civil rights heroes". The Washington Post
  11. Winston&, Kimberly. "Blacks say atheists were unseen civil rights heroes". The Washington Post
  12. Video Found Of Humanist Slamming Steve Harvey's Comments at AAI 2009
  13. Video Found Of Humanist Slamming Steve Harvey's Comments at AAI 2009
  14. Video Found Of Humanist Slamming Steve Harvey's Comments at AAI 2009