Special public use doctrine

From Conservapedia

Jump to: navigation, search

The U.S. Supreme Court has invoked the special-public-interest doctrine to uphold statutes that, in the absence of overriding treaties, limit the right of noncitizens to exploit a State's natural resources:

  • McCready v. Virginia, 94 U.S. 391 (1877)
  • Patsone v. Pennsylvania, 232 U.S. 138 (1914)
  • Hauenstein v. Lynham, 100 U.S. 483 (1880) (to inherit real property)
  • Blythe v. Hinckley, 180 U.S. 333 (1901) (to inherit real property)
  • Terrace v. Thompson, 263 U.S. 197 (1923) (to acquire and own land)
  • Porterfield v. Webb, 263 U.S. 225 (1923) (to acquire and own land)
  • Webb v. O'Brien, 263 U.S. 313 (1923) (to acquire and own land)
  • Frick v. Webb, 263 U.S. 326 (1923) (to acquire and own land)

A decision in the other direction was Oyama v. California, 332 U.S. 633 (1948).

Personal tools