Stalin Peace Prize

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The International Stalin Prize or the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples (renamed Международная Ленинская премия «За укрепление мира между народами»}}, the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples as a result of deStalinization) was the Soviet Union's equivalent to the Nobel Peace Prize. It was awarded by a panel appointed by the Soviet government, to notable individuals whom the panel felt had "strengthened peace among peoples".

Following Nikita Khrushchev's denunciation of Stalin at the Twentieth Party Congress held in 1956, on September 6 the prize was renamed the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples. All previous recipients were asked to return their Stalin Prizes so they could be replaced by the renamed Lenin Prize. By a decision of Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of December 11, 1989, the prize was renamed the International Lenin Peace Prize (Template:Lang-ru)[1]. Two years later, following the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia ended the award program.

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