Talk:Essay:Greatest Conservative TV Shows

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Six Million Dollar Man

The technology could have been developed by private companies under contract with the government.--Andy Schlafly 18:18, 25 May 2011 (EDT)

It "could've" been a lot of things, and I would gladly concede the point given any evidence to back up such an assertion. But as I recall, the protagonist was an astronaut who was "put back together" by the OSI (a fictional government agency) and worked in the public service thereafter. LloydR 18:29, 25 May 2011 (EDT)

Star Trek

The Federation was an extremely socialist government, to the point where the very concept of money was downright offensive to humans. Furthermore, the only "capitalist" race in Star Trek--the Ferengi--started off as villains in the early TNG episodes before becoming comic relief pn DS9. --[[User:AdamDiscordia|Yours in Christ, Adam Discordia]] 00:08, 26 May 2011 (EDT)

Sounds like Star Trek should be downgraded to "Debatable Whether Conservative." Please feel free to move it ... but "Trekies" may not like that!--Andy Schlafly 00:26, 26 May 2011 (EDT)
Aye. They got rid of money. TOS was actually started off as a protest of war and the US involvement in foreign affairs. That's why the "Prime Directive" is to not interfere with other cultures. Ayzmo 20:38, 4 October 2011 (EDT)
I could and should write a major critique of Star Trek as not only being anti-Conservative but anti-American. Also anti-Common Sense. Star Trek has many episodes that cater to the worries of the Left, from overpopulation to gay rights, but more so is that it is the future according to the Left. This is their idealized vision of the future. Where there is no famine, no poverty, no greed. Everyone works to "better oneself." What they don't explain is how and why. Liberalism, in various forms, is replete throughout the franchise. I could easily do an article about it. --Wayfinder 20:00, 8 December 2011 (EST)

Watch "The Trouble with Tribbles" and then tell me if they still used money or not. Harry Mudd is the epitome of greed. --Ed Poor Talk 01:24, 3 February 2012 (EST)

The Simpsons?

This may be a long shot but could the Simpsons fit under the Debatable category? Although it does occasionally send liberal messages, it embraces very conservative family values. I'm just not sure whether or not its liberal messages exclude it entirely from being included here. --JimMac 09:31, 26 May 2011 (EDT)

Personally, I don't any value -- conservative or otherwise -- in the Simpsons. I think it presents Hollywood's negative caricature of the family, as several other sitcoms have. But I welcome comments by others about this show, and thanks for the suggestion.--Andy Schlafly 10:23, 26 May 2011 (EDT)
I would agree - showing a dysfunctional family is hardly conservative. It would be like saying the abysmal "Married with children" is conservative. TracyS 11:21, 26 May 2011 (EDT)

Action shows

I'm thinking about shows from my youth, such as CHiPs - which portrays law enforcement in a positive light, while wholesome lead characters and little violence, and MacGuyver, again a show with little violence and a character using Yankee ingenuity to extract himself from a tight situation. TracyS 11:21, 26 May 2011 (EDT)

King Of the Hill

Definitely conservative...its definitely the most realistic modern cartoon show and the Hill family is Republican (but not demonized for being so). RichDunbar 23:50, 28 May 2011 (EDT)

Storage Wars

Emphasizes capitalist and free market values. Plus on another level, it illustrates the importance of personal responsibility; the lockers that are being auctioned off belonged to people who decided not to pay their bills. --FergusE 16:43, 7 July 2011 (EDT)

I would recommend removing this show, as a previous employee of the show has stated that the show is rigged, including giving people more money to allow higher (and more dramatic) bidding, as well as seeding the storage units with valuable items that the previous owners had not left behind. MackD 22:32, 20 February 2013 (EST)

Pawn Stars

While it does prove the free market prevails, the show contains a great deal of profanity.--JamesWilson 14:04, 21 July 2011 (EDT)

Conservative humour

I am sorry if this is a silly (or repeated) question but how do you define conservative humour? MaxFletcher 23:41, 19 September 2011 (EDT)

My personal definition is humor that shows the irony and extreme folly in following liberal beliefs. There's a lot of good stuff out there. RSnelik 00:28, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
Examples of conservative humor would include poking fun of political correctness, demonstrating contradictions in liberal beliefs, establishing some accountability for liberal falsehoods, and overcoming liberal censorship.--Andy Schlafly 01:03, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

The Office

I am not sure about this one. While Ryan is clearly a caricature of liberal hypocrite, the show is still mocking conservatives like Dwight and Angela (who is an conservative hypocrite). The best presented characters (Jim & Pam) are clearly liberals.--ARamis 23:43, 19 September 2011 (EDT)

We all know Steve Carell used to work on The Daily Show, right?--CamilleT 01:15, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
The lame Daily Show would never permit the conservative humor that Carell portrayed on The Office. Could that be why he left the Daily Show for the Office???--Andy Schlafly 02:00, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
Okey Dokey.--CamilleT 02:45, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
I would not be surprised to learn it if Steve Carell made more per episode of the office while he was on that show than he did his entire tenure at the daily show. --DrDean 11:14, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
Also I thought that Jim was the main character. --DrDean 11:43, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
I truly believe that this is a pro-liberal show. As DrDean said, Jim, a liberal, is the main character and he is depicted as a pretty nice guy.--ARamis 16:43, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

The Office portrays homosexuality in a positive light and goes as far as to promote it (clear example: NBC.com IMDb, an episode that includes a homosexual looking directly at the camera and saying "Kids, sometimes it pays to be gay.") --Ty 17:10, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

Also, the early episodes do indeed indulge in "political correctness." The very second episode covers the subject, where Michael offends everyone and makes everybody uncomfortable because he keeps talking about race and holds others to racial stereotypes. The whole episode is about him being insensitive to other cultures and how it's bad. I'd also like to point out that Ricky Gervais, the creator of the original The Office and one of the big brains behind the American series is an atheist and probable liberal, and likely had much influence over development. Particularly in the earlier episodes.--CamilleT 17:27, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
Thank you for refreshing our memories, Camille. The piece Gervais wrote in The Wall Street Journal of December 22, 2010 says it all: Why I Do Not Believe in a God ("In a provocative essay at Christmas, a British writer and comedian explains why he remains an avowed atheist").--Ty 17:48, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

Antiques Roadshow

Here is all I found on the fraud scandal. A couple of dealers on the show were using their fame to acquire antiques below price. There are many dealers on the show. I suggest Antiques Roadshow be reinstated.--CamilleT 11:54, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

I couldn't fit it into the edit summary but apparently many of them would bring around objects that they already owned and have associates bring them in posing as their owners and give them high appraisals on air as well. I think that it should be removed from the list all together myself. --DrDean 12:00, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
I see. I am a bit of a fan of the show. May I ask for a citation, please?--CamilleT 12:01, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
this book--DrDean 12:10, 20 September 2011 (EDT)
@%#^#@ Every time I want to learn something I always have to read a book. Well, I'll take your word for it. I'm broke, and my library is far away.--CamilleT 12:12, 20 September 2011 (EDT)

Star Trek

The idea has already been discussed and you at least approved of a move. I further contributed that the show was created as a protest against the US' involvement in the Vietnam War. Roddenberry believed that the US should not be involved in the affairs of other countries as shown in the Prime Directive.[1]. It is also quite progressive in many ways including questioning values of all levels. The economy in Star Trek is entirely nonexistent with no money and exchanges instead fulfilled on the promise of self-betterment. I can go on if you like. Ayzmo :) 22:12, 21 October 2011 (EDT)

The views of a creator of a show are almost irrelevant. The point is what the show became, and your comments do not fully address the reasons given for its inclusion.--Andy Schlafly 22:56, 21 October 2011 (EDT)
Overall, the show may not have been conservative, but "created to protest Vietnam"? Uh, no - One of its most famous episodes, "The City on the Edge of Forever", by having uber-pacifism take hold in the 30s and keep us out of WWII long enough for the Nazis to win, effectively accused the protestors of treason ([2] and don't take my word for it: one of the producers was asked years later if that was deliberate and said that "of course" it was).--ArchModerate 15:46, 25 March 2013 (EDT)

7th Heaven

I disagree. Although I'm grateful to have any Christian family at all portrayed on TV, it seemed more like liberal Christianity to me.

I watched the first 8 shows on DVD. In one show, the sister asks her brother to teach her how to kiss (on the lips), which is as near to incest as I've seen on TV as I can ever remember. In another show, they reprise the "black church burning" hoax.

I'd say it was a liberal feminist view of a protestant minister and his family. The mom was clearly the head of household and ruler of the roost. --Ed Poor Talk 01:23, 3 February 2012 (EST)

The funniest skits on SNL...

Isn't that getting really subjective? Funniest by who's standard? Yours? Are you the official gatekeeper for "conservative humor"? This whole entry is definitely more blog-like than encyclopedic. --JoshuaB 21:27, 16 March 2012 (EDT)

Intrinsic humor exists - skits that are considered enormously funny by the vast majority of viewers. The identified skits surely qualify.--Andy Schlafly 01:00, 18 March 2012 (EDT)

Emily Latella

Mocked how tv networks give equal time to opposing opinions which are ridiculous. With skits such as complaining about "no violins on TV before 10 PM" (it was really "violence on TV") or "why are we making Puerto Rico a steak? Pretty soon they'll want mashed potatoes!" Emily Latella frequently misunderstood what the debate was about and came up with ridiculous "counterarguments". She was obviously not a commentator who was supposed to be on the same level as those who were saying we shouldn't show violence on TV before 10:00 or that we should make Puerto Rico a state. And there was that skit where she criticized the "Eagle Rights Amendment" by questioning why we were allowing birds to hold jobs. Gregkochuconn 10:30, 21 March 2012 (EDT)

Star Trek redux

I know this issue has been discussed before, but by no stretch of the imagination is Star Trek a conservative show. Star Trek fell just short of being propaganda for a progressive secular humanist agenda. Which makes sense considering the show's creator was a progressive atheist secular humanist, and his personal beliefs were woven into the very fabric of the show. Would a conservative show have a future where the United States no longer exists as a sovereign nation but instead is part of a one world government? And would a conservative have that one world government in turn be a socialist government that was an eager participant in a United Nations style Federation of Planets? Would a conservative place the HQ for the Federation in San Francisco!? Would a conservative write a show where religion (if portrayed at all) was shown in a negative light? Do bible believing Christians believe in Vulcans? The list goes on and on. From the show's advocacy of socialism and multiculturalism to Captain Kirk's "relaxed" sexual morality. So unless any compelling evidence to the contrary is presented, I'll remove it from the list. --DonnyC 16:44, 14 January 2013 (EST)

Certainly true of the Original Series (and the Next Generation was even worse), but Deep Space 9, made after the militant atheist creator had died, portrays religion (specifically the Bajoran one) in a clearly positive light.--ArchModerate 15:46, 25 March 2013 (EDT)

No Duck Dynasty?

I'm not a huge fan, but i would have bet my last dollar it would have shown up here on this list, even though most of the situations seem to be manufactured.

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