Talk:Monotheism

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Isnt' Christianity technically tritheistic? "Father, Son and the Holy Ghost"?


-Most Christians are trinitarians, which means they basically believe that there is "one God with three persons." Some are unitarians, which means they believe in one God exclusively. Generally, most Christians wouldn't call themselves tritheistic, they would just say they believe there are multiple manifestations of God.--John 13:43, 5 March 2007 (EST)



I de-capitalized "God," as I think of this term as referring (at least in American contexts) to the Christian or Muslim God, and since we're talking about all monotheistic religions here I think it'd be more appropriate to be broader.--John 13:43, 5 March 2007 (EST)

Article needs to be expanded

Before June 3, 2009, this article consisted of only three short sentences. I would like to make this into a properly informative article by copying in the additions that I have made to this week to the Monotheism article in CreationWiki. A Conservapedia administrator informed me, when I first joined Conservapedia, that this is proper as long as I give notice on this discussion page that my contribution originally appeared in CreationWiki

The text I copy in will have many places that could be given appropriate scholarly citations. I can supply these if desired, but I notice that many Conservapedia articles are accepted without requiring a large number of footnotes, and it was this style that I generally followed. The important references, however, are given. I expect the article to be controversial to anyone who does not believe the Biblical revelation that mankind, from the first, was given knowledge of the one true God. I hope that anyone who does not agree with that will not just delete the references I have given to support this, but will provide adequate counterarguments (not just "the majority of scholars do not believe this" such as we might expect to find from Wikipedia administrators).
Latent 16:24, 3 June 2009 (EDT)

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