Talk:Periodic table of the elements

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1A 2A * 3B 4B 5B 6B 7B 8B 1B 2B 3A 4A 5A 6A 7A 8A
1
H
1.006


2
He
4.003


3
Li
6.939


4
Be
9.012


5
B
10.811


6
C
12.011


7
N
14.007


8
O
15.999


9
F
18.998


10
Ne
20.179


11
Na
22.989


12
Mg
24.305


13
Al
26.981


14
Si
28.085


15
P
30.973


16
S
32.065


17
Cl
35.453


18
Ar
39.948


19
K
39.098


20
Ca
40.078


21
Sc
44.955


22
Ti
47.867


23
V
50.941


24
Cr
51.996


25
Mn
54.938


26
Fe
55.845


27
Co
58.933


28
Ni
58.693


29
Cu
63.546


30
Zn
65.409


31
Ga
69.723


32
Ge
72.64


33
As
74.921


34
Se
78.96


35
Br
79.904


36
Kr
83.798


Contents

Merge

Clearly, the two articles should be merged. I would have gone for merging this one with the one without the "the", but a quick Google search seems to indicate that "Periodic table of the elements" is more common. Philip J. Rayment 09:26, 18 July 2007 (EDT)

Early submit

Whoops, hit the wrong button there. INUSE template still applies, I think. --Jenkins 18:59, 17 January 2008 (EST)

That looks great! I would never have been able to do that, at least not in a short enough time span that I wouldn't first lose interest. HelpJazz 19:08, 17 January 2008 (EST)
Thanks! I'm one of those "Lock him into a room, keep up a steady supply of pizza and caffeine, and you can get miracles!" guys :P
That being said: Wow, typing all those numbers and looking up the element names was a serious "once and never again" event. --Jenkins 19:43, 17 January 2008 (EST)
It looks great, though. I'm not 100% sure I could have done that even with an endless supply if pizza and caffeine. Of course now that we have all those nice redlinks I have some more work cut out for myself :) HelpJazz 19:52, 17 January 2008 (EST)
Wow. Good work :) 10px Fox (talk|contribs) 19:56, 17 January 2008 (EST)

Circular table of elements

I've never seen that before. Can someone explain the method behind that apparent madness?-MexMax 20:31, 21 January 2008 (EST)

It's been a while since basic chem, but I think it has to do with the periodicity of the periodic table. The only patterns that continue across and down the table are the atomic mass and atomic number, but everything else has some sort of regular pattern to it. Take stable ions, for example. Clorine is stable as Cl-, argon is stable as Ar, and then if you go "around" to the other side, sodium is stable as Na+ and magnesium is stable as Mg2+. This is better shown in the circular table, because you can go from -1 to +2 without having to jump anywhere.
That's not very in-depth, but that's the principle behind it. HelpJazz 20:50, 21 January 2008 (EST)

Very clever, thanks so much! I still think I prefer my rectangular table. Call me old-fashioned...-MexMax 20:53, 21 January 2008 (EST)

Oh me too, and probably most chemists. I think the circular table is just an interesting thought experiment. And it's a lot harder to draw :) HelpJazz 22:40, 21 January 2008 (EST)

New names for elements 114 & 116

I live in California and remembered reading a news article stating that one of the elements has now been officially named after the city of Livermore (CA) close to where I live, and where the Lawrence Livermore National Lab is located. It's been named "Livermorium". Another element is now called "Flerovium". They replaced two of the "Unun-" named elements in the periodic table, if I recall correctly.

Here is the link to the news story: http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jun/01/science/la-sci-sn-heavy-elements-20120601

Quote: "Element 114 has been officially named flerovium and element 116 livermorium. The super-heavy elements 114 and 116 have officially been recognized by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, the official arbiter of chemical names, and have been named in honor of the U.S. and Russian institutions where they were jointly discovered. Element 116 has been named livermorium with the symbol Lv in honor of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the nearby city of Livermore."

I don't know how to edit charts, so could someone who does, make the changes? Thanks in advance! Taj 12:52, 15 October 2012 (EDT)

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